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Motoman Teach Pendants And More

Yaskawa Motoman, an American subsidiary of Yaskawa Electric Corporation, was founded in 1989 and since then have been able to get over 380,000 industrial robots, 10 million servos, and 18 million drives into automation systems around the world. Robots are the wave of the future and Yaskawa Motoman is at the top of this market. Using an automated robotic system in your work space will allow you to free up many other costs and resources that may not have been available before.  The key to efficiency is simplicity and using  Motoman Teach Pendants to give instructions to your robot makes that possible.

Teach Pendants are non-tethered devices that allow your robot to be controlled remotely. These devices are crucial for industrial robotics as they are not only used for assigning operations but they are able to edit commands, emergency stop commands, and even view past operations. Motoman Teach Pendants are split between the older models(ERC, XRC, MRC) and the newer models(DX and NX Series’).

MRC

The older models such as the MRC, which came out in 1994, were able to increase the workload of an industrial robot by up to 300%. This was also the first time ever that a single teach pendant was able to control two robots at the same time. Four years later when the XRC model was released, it was a huge improvement as Motoman was able to add control of more axes and even up its synchronous control of two robots to four industrial robots.

nx100

Later in 2004, the NX series of controllers was released. These devices featured Windows CE with a high-power processor, back-lit color touchscreen, built-in ethernet, and a huge amount of memory. A single teach pendant can control up to 36 axes and 4 separate robots. It’s Advanced Robot Motion control allows for the most accurate results. For information about the DX series, please visit one of our previous blog posts featuring the DX200 controller and Yaskawa’s new ArcWorld project.

Yaskawa Motoman Swordfighter

Yaskawa Motoman Swordfighter

Industrial robotics is pretty under-recognized It’s easy to think they’re all about manufacturing. But just watch as Motoman-MH24 normally found assembling or packing products in a factory, takes on a new lease on its automation life and becomes a master sword fighter.

Motoman-MH24 is a 630-pound high-speed industrial robot made by Japan’s Yaskawa Electric Corporation. The Yaskawa Bushido Project is a short video clip showing Japanese master swordsman and five times Guinness World Record holder Isao Machii teach Motoman-MH24 the way of the sword. The company made this promotional clip to celebrate what they dub “manufacturing spirit” as they near their 100th anniversary.

To date, Machii has demonstrated some pretty radical feats with his blade: slicing a flying shrimp pelleted at him at 80mph in half, and a neon ball flung at him at 150mph – and these are just some of the things the dude can do.

The Yaskawa researchers examined Machii’s sword techniques in 3D. Next, they got Motoman to reproduce the very same movements, and the results are superb. In a showdown between master and robot-apprentice, the pair first demonstrates a four-directional cut in flawless sync. Then Motoman-MH24 reproduces each of Machii’s cuts down to a tee.

Things start really heating up when the robot actually looks like it’s gaining an upper hand over its human trainer. While Machii horizontally slices one orange, Motoman-MH24 takes down six in one fell swoop. The most epic scene is probably the one where Motoman splices a really thin pea pod in half.

While Machii looks visibly tired towards the end of the final “1000 cuts” scene, his mechanical counterpart could probably go on for at least an extra 100000.

Click to view our Yaskawa Drives and Controls currently for sale.