Monthly Archives: September 2013

Unidrive Classic

Troubleshooting a Unidrive with Hardware Fault Trip Codes

Unidrive Classics are going to trip at one time or another. Refer to this list of hardware faults next time your Uni1405 or other Unidrive is throwing a mysterious code.

HF81 – Software Error (odd address word)
HF82 – Large option module removed
HF83 – Power Board Code Failure
HF84 – Current Offset Trim Failure
HF85 – A to D failure (ES-CC step)
HF86 – Interrupt Watchdog failure
HF87 – Internal ROM check error
HF88 – Watchdog Failure
HF89 – Unused Interrupts (nmi as source)
HF90 – Stack Overflow
HF91 – Stack Underflow
HF92 – Software Error (undefined op code)
HF93 – Software Error (protection fault)
HF94 – Software Error (odd address word)
HF95 – Software Error (odd address inst.)
HF96 – Software Error (illegal ext bus)
HF97 – Level 1 Noise
HF98 – Interrupt Crash
HF99 – Level 1 Crash

A few notes on these trip codes:

  • HF trips are internal hardware faults within the drive. Powering the drive down and re-applying power could clear the fault.
  • Resetting the drive will not clear a HF trip.
  • If a HF trip occurs, the Drive Healthy relay will open to indicate this
  • The serial communications will not function during a HF trip
  • The only HF trip that can be caused by the user is a HF82 trip where a
    large option module is removed while the drive is powered up.The drive should be powered down, the module re-fitted correctly and the power reapplied to clear the trip
If you end up needing to replace your drive, MRO Electric stocks Unidrive Classics and can offer an exchange credit for your faulty unit against the price of the new drive. We also provide pre-priced Unidrive repair services. Shoot us an e-mail at sales@mroelectric.com or call 800-691-8511, and we’ll send you a  quote ASAP.

Real Time Data Collection using PLC Networking

This article from Control Engineering offers a great preview of the future of manufacturing with PLCs. Ethernet connections allow for real time data collection, which introduces great networking potential between workers and the machines. Because PLCs can be programmed to make decisions based on input variables, we can automate more tasks but still be confident that process variables are under control. The development and innovation of I/O Modules creates the backbone of the networking configuration.

Another exciting revelation in the article:

To meet the growing operation needs of industrial automation, networks continue to expand, offering monitoring and control capabilities in areas not previously possible. Device networks are now using fieldbus-to-Ethernet integration to develop enterprise-wide control networks. Merging networking functionality with PLCs enables users to off-load main processor tasks for distributed control in the field, placing control-level devices closer to the action. Additionally, by combining control with distributed I/O, manufacturers can lower their total cost of operation by streamlining data acquisition, communication, and factory-wide connectivity.

We can’t wait to see how users pair the networking capabilities of PLCs with infrastructure already in place on the factory floor.

North Carolina Manufacturing Expansion Project

Great news from our home state of North Carolina – the manufacturing company Oiles America is expanding their facility outside of Charlotte and increasing production capacity by 75%. From an article in the Charlotte Observer:

The project was completed to help increase manufacturing capacity and enable the company to expand its product line. Included in the expansion are increased research and development facilities, and renovations to existing office and warehouse spaces.

The project also will incorporate energy efficiency technology and occupancy sensors, and it has the potential to use solar energy in the future.