Monthly Archives: May 2019

Yaskawa Drive Types

Yaskawa

Yaskawa Electric is a global manufacturer of high-quality parts used in robotics and automation. They specialize in servos, controllers, switches, robots, drives and more. These parts are used for a variety of purposes in industry. In this post, we will be distinguishing the different types of Yaskawa drives.

CIMR Drives
E7 Drives– Designed for commercial HVAC applications. Embedded with Modbus, APOGEE FLN and Metasys N2.
F7 Drives– Well-rounded drive with a variety of uses. Contains NEMA Type 12 enclosure with space to expand filters, fuses, I/O cards and more.
G7 Drives– Low voltage drive that uses 3 level control to combat problems with long motor cables and premature motor bearing failure. Great vector performance and flexibility. Configured options with pre-engineered cabinet options available.
P7 Drives– Created for applications with variable torque like centrifugal pumps and fans.

yaskawa p7

GPD Drives
GPD 333– General purpose AC Drive, 1/4 the size of normal PWM drives.
GPD 503/505/506– High-performance three phase voltage/frequency output with adjustable speed control.
GPD 515- PWM AC drive designed for low motor noise and high starting torque.

Microdrives
J1000 Drives– General purpose drives with open loop voltage/frequency control with preferred parameter feature. Simple variable speed of up to 7.5HP.
V1000 Drives- Compact current vector drive designed for efficiency and maintainability. Capable of up to 25HP. Economical for basic variable speed applications.
V1000-4X Drive- The same as the V1000 but with an enclosure built for dust tight environments.

Other Drives
A1000 Drives – High performance general purpose drive capable of up to 1000HP. Used for general purposes.
P1000 Drives – Torque performance capable of withstanding 1000HP. Oriented towards variable torque applications including centrifugal pumps and fans. Configured and bypass options available.
U1000 Industrial Matrix Drives – Regenerative high performance vector drive capable of up to 800HP. Used for general purposes.

Source: https://www.yaskawa.com/

Visit MRO Electric and Supply’s website to see all of our available Yaskawa Drives. If we don’t have what you need listed on the site, contact us at sales@mroelectric.com or (800) 691-8511 and we will be happy to help!

How does a relay work?

What is relay?

A relay is an electrically controlled switch that has the ability to turn a circuit on or off. Depending on the application relays can do a number of things. Relays can be used as switches to turn things on and off, or as amplifiers to convert smaller currents into larger ones. They can also be used to control a circuit with a low power signal or when multiple circuits need to be controlled by a single signal.

There are two kinds of relays, electromagnetic and solid state. In this post, we will be focusing on electromagnetic relays and how they work.

Basic Parts of a relay

Armature– is a basic metal piece that is balanced on a pivot or a stand. It is considered the moving ‘arm’ of the relay. It makes or breaks the connection with the contacts connected to it.

Spring– is connected to one end of the armature and pushes the armature back into place if no current is passing through.

Electromagnet– is a metal wire wrapped around a metal core. The wire does not have magnetic property but can be converted into a magnet with the help of an electrical signal.

Yoke– is a small metal piece affixedon a core which attracts and holds the armature when the coil is energized.

Contacts– conductive material that exists within the device whose physical contact opens or closes a circuit

A break refers to the number of locations on a circuit that a switch can make or break the flow of current. In electromechanical relays, there can be single breaks and double breaks. A single break is usually used with low power devices while a double break is usually used with high power devices.

A pole refers to the number of circuits that relays can pass through a switch. A single pole contact carries current through one circuit, while a double can carry it through two.

A throw refers to the number of separate wiring paths. For example, a triple throw switch can be connected to one of three contacts instead of one.

How does it work?

Source:
https://www.electronics-tutorials.ws/io/io_5.html

In an electromechanical relay, a small circuit has the ability to switch a larger circuit on or off through contacts by using an electromagnet. When charged, the electromagnet creates a magnetic field that attracts the armature and closes the contacts. Some contacts come in different configurations depending on the use of the relay. A normally open (NO) relay’s contacts are open when there is no current passing through, while a normally closed (NC) relay’s contacts are closed when there is no current passing through.

Source:
https://www.explainthatstuff.com/howrelayswork.html

There are many things to consider when choosing a relay for a project. Lifespan, operating environment, mechanical loads, size, and number and type of contacts are all important factors in choosing the right relay.

Pros and Cons of Electromagnetic relays

Advantages

Fast operation and reset

More definitive ON/OFF

Simple and most reliable

Disadvantages

Suffers the effects of age

No directional features


MRO Electric and Supply has an extensive inventory of relays in stock.  Please call email sales@mroelectric or call us at 800-691-8511 for a quote.