Yaskawa GPD 506 / P5 and GDP 515 / G5 Alarm Codes

This helpful article will cover a few things you need to know about the basics of Yaskawa GPD 506 / P5 and GDP 515 / G5 alarm codes.

The GPD 506 / P5 and GDP 515 / G5 are able to store up to four faults. The GPD 515 / G5 inverter has a fault trace. The fault trace saves the drive status at the time of the fault. It also has a fault history that indicates elapsed time of stored fault.

Yaskawa GPD515C-A008 AC Drive

What is an alarm code?

If you are new to Yaskawa alarm codes and their ability to trigger a warning in the industrial setting, this article will help explain what the GPD 506 / P5 and GDP 515 / G5 alarm codes are and how these alarm codes assist you when a problem arises.

Yaskawa identifies three main categories of alarm codes, or fault codes. The three Yaskawa fault codes are a major fault, a minor fault, and a parameter setting error. These categories help determine a helpful intervention so let us look at these three fault codes in more detail.

The Major Fault

A GPD 506 / P5 and GDP 515 / G5 will display a major fault when the motor coasts to a stop. The fault is displayed on the digital operator. The fault relay is activated.

The Minor Fault

When a minor fault occurs, the operation can continue while the fault flashes on the digital operator. A minor fault does not activate the fault relay.

Parameter Setting Error

When an inverter is no longer able to run, the parameter setting error fault is displayed on the digital operator. The same as a minor fault, the parameter setting error does not active the fault relay.

Major fault codes for the 506, 515, and the 505

  1. 506, 515 FAULT: UV1
    505 FAULT: Uu1

    Undervoltage of the main circuit when running.
    230 V Units – trip point 190 V DC or less.
    460 V Units – trip point 380 V DC or less.
    600 V Units – trip point 546 V DC or less.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is a single-phase condition on the input and low input voltage at L1, L2, and
    L3.

    Possible Corrective Action
    The possible corrective action is to check the three-phase input voltage and verify L2-05 for
    515/G5 units.
  2. 506, 515 FAULT: UV2 CTL P Undervolt
    505 FAULT: Uu2

    Under voltage of the control circuit when running.
    230 V Units – 30 kW ~ 75 kW, monitors the (-15 V) power supply
    460 V Units – 55 kW ~ 160 kW, monitors the (-15 V) power supply

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is that a connected external load is pulling down the inverter power supplies.

    Possible Corrective Action
    The possible corrective action is to repair or replace the power drive board.
  3. 506, 515 FAULT: UV3 MC Answerback
    505 FAULT: Uu3

    The pre-charged contactor opened while the inverter is running. This fault applies to 230 V units
    18 kW ~ 75 kW, 460 V units 22 kW ~ 160 kW and 600 V units 30 kW ~ 160 kW.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is that the contacts on the contactor are dirty and do not function
    mechanically.

    Possible Corrective Action
    The possible correction is to the check the contactor and the ribbon cable from the control
    board to the gate drive board.
  4. 506, 515 FAULT: OV DC Bus Overvolt
    505 FAULT: ou

    Overvoltage of the main circuit when running.
    230 V Units – trip point 400 V DC or more.
    460 V Units – trip point 800 V DC or more.
    600 V Units – trip point 1050 V DC or more.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is high input voltage at L1, L2, and L3. The deceleration point is set too short.
    Power factor correction capacitors are being used on the input to the inverter.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Check the input circuit, verify the program parameters, add a braking resistor, remove the
    power factor correction capacitors.
  5. 506, 515 FAULT: OC Overcurrent
    505 FAULT: OC

    Designed to protect the inverter, this is when output current has exceeded OC level of the
    inverter rated value instantaneously.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is a shorter inverter output phase to phase, shorted motor, or locked rotor.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Remove the motor and run the inverter without the motor. Check the motor for a phase to
    phase short. Check the inverter for a phase to phase short at the output.
  6. 506, 515 FAULT: GF Ground Fault
    505 FAULT: gf

    Designed to protect the inverter, this is when the inverter output grounding current has
    exceeded 50 % of the inverter rated current.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is the motor lead short dot ground, DCCT defective.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Remove the motor and run the inverter without the motor. Check the motor for a phase to
    ground short. Check the output current with a clamp on the meter to verify the DCCT reading.
  7. 506, 515 FAULT: SC Short Circuit
    505 FAULT: SC

    The inverter output is short circuited.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is shorted inverter output phase to phase, a shorted motor, or locked rotor.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Remove the motor and run the inverter without the motor. Check the motor for a phase to
    phase short. Check the inverter for a phase to phase short at the output.
  8. 506, 515 FAULT: PUF DC Bus Fuse Open
    505 FAULT: PUf

    Detects if the DC bus fuse has opened.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is a shorted output transistor, a shorted main circuit component.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Remove power from the inverter and disconnect the motor. Perform the checks without/with
    power. Replace the shorted component(s), then replace the defective fuse.
  9. 506, 515 FAULT: OL1 Motor Overloaded
    505 FAULT: ol1

    Designed to protect the motor, it alerts to the motor overload. A pre-alarm can be set as a
    minor fault by using the multi-function outputs.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is the motor is overloaded.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Verify the program settings, reduce the load on the motor.
  10. 506, 515 FAULT: OL2 Inverter Overloaded
    505 FAULT: ol2

    Designed to protect the inverter, it alerts to the inverter overload. 120 or 150 % of inverter ratd
    current for 1 minute.

    Possible Cause
    The possible cause is the motor is overloaded.

    Possible Corrective Action
    Verify the program settings, reduce the load on the motor.

Why are the alarm codes necessary?

In the manufacturing setting, alarm codes are a necessary and welcome preemptive caution that all is not right with the system. Alarm codes cannot necessarily tell us all that could go wrong with an industrial unit, but it does have its perks. Any time you are given a heads up before something goes wrong, you have a good chance of being able to navigate through a solution.

Alarm codes are the first line of defense against many things that could go wrong while operating a part in an industrial setting. The Yaskawa alarm codes discussed in this article are specifically targeting the GPD 506 / P5 and GDP 515 / G5 drive alarm codes. For a full list of fault codes, visit the appendix here for various types of Yaskawa alarm code cautions.

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