Category Archives: Fanuc

Determining if your FANUC Motor has a Keyway

There are a couple ways to figure out if your FANUC motor has a keyway:

The first is if you can visibly look at the end of the shaft and see the holes on the end of the coupling. If your shaft has one hole at the end in the very center, it is a slick shaft. If the shaft has three holes in a line, that means you have a keyed shaft.

Another way to check if you have a keyed shaft without being able to look at the shaft is reading the OEM label on the FANUC motor. Your motor may have one of two types of labels on it, the first being a yellow FANUC sticker and the other being a silver G.E. FANUC sticker. All of the silver G.E. FANUC stickers on motors have a # suffix indicating a keyed shaft, except for the tag #7000 which indicates that it is actually a slick shaft. The pictures below show what each tag looks like with the # tag.

ge-fanuc

fanuc

The yellow FANUC sticker is a little bit easier to determine. If the part number has the # tag at the end of it, it is a keyed shaft. If there is no # at the end of the part number, that means it is a slick shaft. Below is a picture of a yellow FANUC tag without the # tag.

keyed-shaft

Be sure to check out our article focused on maintaining automation machine tools. Maintenance is unavoidable and compiling maintenance with unnecessary rebuilds is unpractical and will likely result in downtime and lost profit. We also offer top quality repair services on all drives. With a 100% guarantee 12-month warranty we will ensure you are happy with your decision to repair with MRO Electric.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

 

 

 

FANUC Alarm Codes – A06B-6066 Drives – Alarm 5

The following is a list of procedures to fix the Alarm 5 status on your drive:

  • If you are receiving the alarm after a fresh install of the drive, check to make sure all jumpers and wires are set in their correct position. You can find the location for these inside your user manual.
  • Make sure the drive is off. Check the resistances on the drive, and then test the voltage. If it has been powered up recently, you can then turn it on to check the voltage again. However, do not immediately turn it back off to check the resistances again. You must give it at least 30 minutes for the voltage to return to safe levels so that you can check again.
  • To check the voltage, you can test the DC voltage of the jumper attached between screws 17/18 and 19.
  • Using your ground on screw 19 and and the red lead on the other two screws, your reader should say anywhere from .003 to .006 volts.
  • To check the resistance, remove the jumper from screws 15/16 and then tighten the screws. Use an ohm reader to make sure the resistance isn’t OPEN.
  • Check the resistance between screws 17 and 18. If it is 16 ohms that is where you want it to be.

fanuc cnc

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors and spindle drives so you don’t have to worry about it. Please take a look at our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you. Our rebuilds for these size drives usually only take 2-3 days, which includes rebuilding the part, painting the part, and fully testing the part to ensure top quality. By getting your part back to you as soon as possible, you are able to minimize downtime, and by doing the job right you can have peace of mind knowing that your FANUC drive will now work properly and not be the reason for downtime in the future.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Instructions for Installing a 6055 Spindle Drive to A20B-1001-0120

The following is a list of instructions for installing a 6055 Spindle Drive with the A20B-1001-0120 Spindle Drive PCB:

A20B-1001-0120

Instructions:

  1. Make sure the jumpers on the new spindle PCB match the jumpers on your old spindle PCB.
  2. Remove the software chips from the old spindle PCB and install them onto the new spindle PCB.
  3. If possible, remove the NVRAM chip from the old spindle PCB and install it onto the new spindle PCB. This way you will not have to reprogram the chip as the new spindle will have the same instructions as the previous one.
  4. If possible, remove the DAC chip from the old spindle PCB and install is onto the new PCB. There may not be a DAC chip on your previous board and if that is the case do not worry about it. However if the old board does have the chip, failure to install it correctly into the new board will cause issues.
  5. Make sure to set the 200/230 voltage switch to the same setting it is on the old board. This switch also may not be on all drives.

It is very important to follow the manual and make sure that the chips and cards you are moving around are installed correctly. For instance, if you were to incorrectly install the software chips, not only would the display not show anything, you are leaving open the possibilities for a short and causing yourself even more trouble.

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors and spindle drives so you don’t have to worry about it. Please take a look at our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you. Our rebuilds for these size drives usually only take 2-3 days, which includes rebuilding the part, painting the part, and fully testing the part to ensure top quality. By getting your part back to you as soon as possible, you are able to minimize downtime, and by doing the job right you can have peace of mind knowing that your FANUC drive will now work properly and not be the reason for downtime in the future.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Instructions for Installing PCB to A06B-6052-H001/4 and more

The following is a list of instructions for installing the these Spindle Drives:

With the A16B-1100-0080 Spindle Drive PCB.

This guide covers the same installation procedure for the following parts:

spindle drive pcb

Instructions:

  1. Make sure the jumpers on the new spindle PCB match the jumpers on your old spindle PCB.
  2. Check to see the status of the 200/230 voltage switch on the old spindle PCB and set it to the same setting on the new spindle drive. You can locate the switch underneath the lid on smaller drives.
  3. Remove the software chip on the old spindle drive and install it into the new one.
  4. If you used a DAC chip in your old spindle, you can can remove it from your old spindle PCB and install it into your new one.

It is very important to follow the manual and make sure that the chips and cards you are moving around are installed correctly. For instance, if you were to incorrectly install the software chips, not only would the display not show anything, you are leaving open the possibilities for a short and causing yourself even more trouble.

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors and spindle drives so you don’t have to worry about it. Please take a look at our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you. Our rebuilds for these size drives usually only take 2-3 days, which includes rebuilding the part, painting the part, and fully testing the part to ensure top quality. By getting your part back to you as soon as possible, you are able to minimize downtime, and by doing the job right you can have peace of mind knowing that your FANUC drive will now work properly and not be the reason for downtime in the future.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Proper Maintenance on your FANUC Spindle Motor can Extend its Life

Taking care of your FANUC spindle motor and maintaining it properly is the number one way to ensure it will continue to properly run when you need it. Taking the time to understand why it is important to properly maintain your drives and motors is important in itself. Old equipment is definitely more likely fail than newer equipment, but it is entirely possible for new equipment to fail due to improper lubrication, overheating, contamination of other machine fluids, etc.

Regular Maintenance Checklist

  1. Make sure that there is no other fluids leaking into the Fanuc spindle drive from external sources.
  2. Check the installation to ensure that everything is connected correctly.
  3. Check to make sure the spindle is lubricated correctly. Both too much and too little lubrication is a bad thing so make sure to follow your manual to learn how much you need to use.
  4. Minimizing the amount of vibration on the spindle drive will prevent the dislodging or unseating of any chips/cards/wiring.
  5. Using proper impact prevention on the bearings inside the spindle will ensure the least amount of physical stress on the machine itself.

fanuc cnc

By following these steps at least once a month, you are doing yourself a service by making sure your spindle drive is maintained properly. You are saving yourself from having to get parts repaired or buying new parts, and in turn saving money and preventing downtime.

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors so you don’t have to worry about it. Please take a look at our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

 

Instructions for Installing PCB to A06B-6059-H001/4 and A06B-6060-H001/7 Spindle Drives

The following is a list of instructions for installing the these Spindle Drives with the A16B-1100-0200 Spindle Drive PCB:

And these Spindle Drives with the A16B-1100-0241 Spindle Drive PCB:

  • A06B-6060-H001
  • A06B-6060-H002
  • A06B-6060-H003
  • A06B-6060-H004
  • A06B-6060-H005
  • A06B-6060-H006
  • A06B-6060-H007

fanuc cnc

Instructions:

  1. Make sure the jumpers on the new spindle PCB match the jumpers on your old spindle PCB.
  2. Remove the software chips from the old spindle PCB and install them onto the new spindle PCB.
  3. If possible, remove the NVRAM chip from the old spindle PCB and install it onto the new spindle PCB. This way you will not have to reprogram the chip as the new spindle will have the same instructions as the previous one.

It is very important to follow the manual and make sure that the chips and cards you are moving around are installed correctly. For instance, if you were to incorrectly install the software chips, not only would the display not show anything, you are leaving open the possibilities for a short and causing yourself even more trouble.

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors and spindle drives so you don’t have to worry about it. Please take a look at our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you. Our rebuilds for these size drives usually only take 2-3 days, which includes rebuilding the part, painting the part, and fully testing the part to ensure top quality. By getting your part back to you as soon as possible, you are able to minimize downtime, and by doing the job right you can have peace of mind knowing that your FANUC drive will now work properly and not be the reason for downtime in the future.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Setting the Sensor Gap on your Fanuc Spindle Motor

Today we will be helping you with your installation of a spindle motor. Alarms are caused by tensions issues with the belt – either being too tight or too loose in relation to the sensor. MRO Electric and Supply offers both new and refurbished FANUC Spindle amps, troubleshooting on our blog for a wide variety of parts, and repair services on any product we offer.

Steps for fixing the sensor gap

  1. Disconnect the wiring inside of the terminal box.
  2. Next take out the 4 bolts that hold the shroud/fan to the motor.
  3. Remove the screws from the cover of the sensor on the motor.
  4.  Loosen the screws holding the sensor in place until you have enough room to be able to slide a piece of paper between the gear and sensor.
  5. Tighten the 2 screws that hold the sensor in place to make sure they do not rub against each other at all.
  6. Fasten the sensor cover back to the sensor and tighten accordingly.
  7. Reattach the shroud and the fan to the motor.
  8. Configure the wiring back to what it was originally.

fanuc cnc

Now that the sensor for your FANUC Spindle amp is corrected, it should work properly. If you are still having issues we recommend looking throughout our blog as we have many articles based on helping the user troubleshoot any and all issues with their motor.

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors so you don’t have to worry about it. Please take a look at our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

 

Diagnosing your FANUC Current Alarm

If you are getting a high current alarm on your FANUC motor, it is going to be caused by either the motor itself, the drive, or a cable. To begin the process of figuring out which alarm you are receiving you must disconnect the leads from the motor. Try powering it up and look to see if the alarm LED is lit. Fanuc alarms include the HC LED, alarm 8/9/A/B for Servo motors, and alarm 12 for Spindle motors.

fanuc high current

  • If you no longer are seeing an alarm, the motor is most likely bad.
  • If you have powered the motor and are receiving the alarm, the issue is most likely with the drive.

Because you have disconnected the leads from the motor, you are able to use an ohm meter/megger to monitor the power levels of the cable and motor, and make sure they are working as intended. Using a megger will help you decide if your motor is grounded correctly where an ohm reader will let you know if your motor has shorted.

Using your ohm meter check for shorts both leg-to-leg and leg-to-ground on each of the legs. The leg-to-leg readings should be consistently low between every leg while the leg-to-ground readings will stay open. The megger is used to check between the leg and ground to see if the problem could be with the terminal box on the motor or any cables connected to it.

Sometimes you may not have the necessary equipment to make a diagnosis on your motor, but we do. MRO Electric and Supply offers high quality repair services on all motors so you don’t have to worry about it. Check out our website to see all available brands and parts we can service for you.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

 

FANUC M-Codes List for 16i, 18i, and More

M-code are CNC program instructions which help machinists and CNC programmers control CNC hardware like chuck, tailstock, quill, coolant. Here are listed M-code which are mostly used on 16i and 18i FANUC Controls.

Auxiliary Function (M Function)

When a numeral is specified following address M, code signal and a strobe signal are sent to the machine. The machine uses these signals to turn on or off its functions. Usually, only one M code can be specified in one block.

In some cases, however, up to three M codes can be specified for some types of machine tools. Which M code corresponds to which machine function is determined by the machine tool builder.

The machine processes all operations specified by M codes except those specified by M98, M99,M198 or called subprogram(Parameter No.6071 to 6079), or called custom macro (Parameter No.6080 to 6089). Refer to the machine tool builder’s instruction manual for details.

The following M codes have special meanings:

  • M02, M03 (End of Program)
    • This indicates the end of the main program Automatic operation is stopped and the CNC unit is reset.
    • This differs with the machine tool builder. After a block specifying the end of the program is executed, control returns to the start of the program. Bit 5 of parameter 3404 (M02) or bit 4 of parameter 3404 (M30) can be used to disable M02, M30 from returning control to the start of the program.
  • M00 (Program Stop)
    • Automatic operation is stopped after a block containing M00 is executed. When the program is stopped, all existing modal information remains unchanged. The automatic operation can be restarted by actuating the cycle operation. This differs with the machine tool builder.
  • M01 (Optional Stop)
    • Similarly to M00, automatic operation is stopped after a block containing M01 is executed. This code is only effective when the Optional Stop switch on the machine operator’s panel has been pressed.
  • M98 (Calling of Sub-Program)
    • This code is used to call a subprogram. The code and strobe signals are not sent.
  • M99 (End of Subprogram)
    • This code indicates the end of a subprogram. M99 execution returns control to the main program. The code and strobe signals are not sent.
  • M198 (Calling a Subprogram)
    • This code is used to call a subprogram of a file in the external input/output function. See the description of the subprogram call function (III–4.7) for details.

 

Multiple M Commands in a Single Block

In general, only one M code can be specified in a block. However, up to three M codes can be specified at once in a block by setting bit 7 (M3B) of parameter No. 3404 to 1. Up to three M codes specified in a block are simultaneously output to the machine. This means that compared with the conventional method of a single M command in a single block, a shorter cycle time can be realized in machining.

CNC allows up to three M codes to be specified in one block. However, some M codes cannot be specified at the same time due to mechanical operation restrictions. For detailed information about the mechanical operation restrictions on simultaneous specification of multiple M codes in one block, refer to the manual of each machine tool builder. M00, M01, M02, M30, M98, M99, or M198 must not be specified together with another M code. Some M codes other than M00, M01, M02, M30, M98, M99, and M198 cannot be specified together with other M codes; each of those M codes must be specified in a single block.

Such M codes include these which direct the CNC to perform internal operations in addition to sending the M codes themselves to the machine. To be specified, such M codes are M codes for calling program numbers 9001 to 9009 and M codes for disabling advance reading (buffering) of subsequent blocks. Meanwhile, multiple of M codes that direct the CNC only to send the M codes themselves (without performing internal operations ) can be specified in a single block.

M Code Group Check Function

The M code group check function checks if a combination of multiple M codes (up to three M codes) contained in a block is correct.

This function has two purposes. One is to detect if any of the multiple M codes specified in a block include an M code that must be specified alone. The other purpose is to detect if any of the multiple M codes specified in a block include M codes that belong to the same group. In either of these cases, P/S alarm No. 5016 is issued. For details on group data setting, refer to the manual available from the machine tool builder.

  • M Code Setting
    • Up to 500 M codes can be specified. In general, M0 to M99 are always specified. M codes from M100 and up are optional.
  • Group Numbers
    • Group numbers can be set from 0 to 127. Note, however, that 0 and 1 have special meanings. Group number 0 represents M codes that need not be checked. Group number 1 represents M codes that must be specified alone.

 

G Codes

G Codes

G Codes

As a generic name for a plain-text language in which CNC machine are able to understand, G-Codes are important to understand in the manufacturing, automation and engineering spaces. You can enter a G-Code manually if you wish, but you do not have to because of the CAD/CAM software’ abilities along with the machine controller.  G-Codes are not necessarily readable by humans, but it’s possible to look through the file and determine what is generally occurring.

In the factory automation space, nobody likes downtime and receiving error codes. While using CNCs (view FANUC CNC parts here), many professionals are faced with G Codes. By definition, a G Code is a computer code language that is used to guide CNC machine devices to perform specific motions. A few examples of specific motions would be:

  • canned cycles
  • work coordinates
  • several repetitive cycles.
G Codes: canned cycles-

Also referred to as a fixed cycle, canned cycles are ways to effectively and efficiently perform repetitive CNC machining operations. They automate specific machining functions. A few examples would be pocketing, threading, and drilling. A canned cycle is almost always stored as a pre-program in a machine’s controller. To learn more about canned cycles, check out this article courtesy of zero-divide.net.

G Codes: work coordinates-

The G Code coordinate pipeline goes something like this:

  • Unit conversion to metric
  • Convert from relative to absolute and polar to Cartesian: g90g91XYZ()
  • G52, G54, and G92 offsets
  • G51 scaling
  • G68 coordinate rotation

G-Code is the most popular programming language used for programming CNC machinery. Some G words alter the state of the machine so that it changes from cutting straight lines to cutting arcs. Other G words cause the interpretation of numbers as millimeters rather than inches. Some G words set or remove tool length or diameter offsets. Be sure to check out our article covering FANUC CNC Codes here.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Tool Parameters, Feeds, and Speeds

Listed below are some easily-understood G-code commands in which are used for setting the speed, feed, and tool parameters.

F= Feed

The F command’s purpose is to set the feed rate. Keep in mind, the machine operates at the specified speed rate when G1 is used, G1 commands are set to operate at the set F value.

An error is likely to occur if the feed rate (F) isn’t set once before the first G1 call.  Here is an example:

  • G1 F1500 X100 Y100

S= Spindle Speed

The S command’s purpose is to set the spindle speed. The Spindle speed is almost always set in RPMs (revolutions per minute). Here is an example:

  • S10000

T= Tool

The T command’s purpose is paired with M6 in order to display the tool number to be used for cutting the current file. Here is an example:

  • M6 T1
Below is a complete listing of G Codes:
  • G00     Rapid traverse 
  • G01     Linear interpolation with feed rate
  • G02     Circular interpolation (clockwise)
  • G03     Circular interpolation (counterclockwise)
  • G2/G3   Helical interpolation
  • G04     Dwell time in milliseconds
  • G05     Spline definition
  • G06     Spline interpolation
  • G07     Tangential circular interpolation, Helix interpolation, Polygon interpolation, Feedrate interpolation
  • G08     Ramping function at block transition / Look ahead “off”
  • G09     No ramping function at block transition / Look ahead “on”
  • G10     Stop dynamic block preprocessing
  • G11     Stop interpolation during block preprocessing
  • G12     Circular interpolation (CW) with radius
  • G13     Circular interpolation (CCW) with radius
  • G14     Polar coordinate programming, absolute
  • G15     Polar coordinate programming, relative
  • G16     Definition of the pole point of the polar coordinate system
  • G17     Selection of the X, Y plane
  • G18     Selection of the Z, X plane
  • G19     Selection of the Y, Z plane
  • G20     Selection of a freely definable plane
  • G21     Parallel axes “on”
  • G22     Parallel axes “off”
  • G24     Safe zone programming; lower limit values
  • G25     Safe zone programming; upper limit values
  • G26     Safe zone programming “off”
  • G27     Safe zone programming “on”
  • G33     Thread cutting with constant pitch
  • G34     Thread cutting with dynamic pitch
  • G35     Oscillation configuration
  • G38     Mirror imaging “on”
  • G39     Mirror imaging “off”
  • G40     Path compensations “off”
  • G41     Path compensation left of the workpiece contour
  • G42     Path compensation right of the workpiece contour
  • G43     Path compensation left of the workpiece contour with altered approach
  • G44     Path compensation right of the workpiece contour with altered approach
  • G50     Scaling
  • G51     Part rotation; programming in degrees
  • G52     Part rotation; programming in radians
  • G53     Zero offset off
  • G54     Zero offset #1
  • G55     Zero offset #2
  • G56     Zero offset #3
  • G57     Zero offset #4
  • G58     Zero offset #5
  • G59     Zero offset #6
  • G63 Feed/spindle override not active
  • G66 Feed/spindle override active
  • G70     Inch format active
  • G71     Metric format active
  • G72     Interpolation with precision stop “off”
  • G73     Interpolation with precision stop “on”
  • G74     Move to home position
  • G75     Curvature function activation
  • G76     Curvature acceleration limit
  • G78     Normalcy function “on” (rotational axis orientation)
  • G79     Normalcy function “off”
G80 – G89 for milling applications:
  • G80     Canned cycle “off”
  • G81     Drilling to final depth canned cycle
  • G82     Spot facing with dwell time canned cycle
  • G83     Deep hole drilling canned cycle
  • G84     Tapping or Thread cutting with balanced chuck canned cycle
  • G85     Reaming canned cycle
  • G86     Boring canned cycle
  • G87     Reaming with measuring stop canned cycle
  • G88     Boring with spindle stop canned cycle
  • G89     Boring with intermediate stop canned cycle
G81 – G88 for cylindrical grinding applications:
  • G81     Reciprocation without plunge
  • G82     Incremental face grinding
  • G83     Incremental plunge grinding
  • G84     Multi-pass face grinding
  • G85     Multi-pass diameter grinding
  • G86     Shoulder grinding
  • G87     Shoulder grinding with face plunge
  • G88     Shoulder grinding with diameter plunge
  • G90     Absolute programming
  • G91     Incremental programming
  • G92     Position preset
  • G93     Constant tool circumference velocity “on” (grinding wheel)
  • G94     Feed in mm / min (or inch / min)
  • G95     Feed per revolution (mm / rev or inch / rev)
  • G96     Constant cutting speed “on”
  • G97     Constant cutting speed “off”
  • G98     Positioning axis signal to PLC
  • G99     Axis offset
  • G100   Polar transformation “off”
  • G101   Polar transformation “on”
  • G102   Cylinder barrel transformation “on”; cartesian coordinate system
  • G103   Cylinder barrel transformation “on,” with real-time-radius compensation (RRC)
  • G104   Cylinder barrel transformation with centerline migration (CLM) and RRC
  • G105   Polar transformation “on” with polar axis selections
  • G106   Cylinder barrel transformation “on” polar-/cylinder-coordinates
  • G107   Cylinder barrel transformation “on” polar-/cylinder-coordinates with RRC
  • G108   Cylinder barrel transformation polar-/cylinder-coordinates with CLM and RRC
  • G109   Axis transformation programming of the tool depth
  • G110   Power control axis selection/channel 1
  • G111   Power control pre-selection V1, F1, T1/channel 1 (Voltage, Frequency, Time)
  • G112   Power control pre-selection V2, F2, T2/channel 1
  • G113   Power control pre-selection V3, F3, T3/channel 1
  • G114   Power control pre-selection T4/channel 1
  • G115   Power control pre-selection T5/channel 1
  • G116   Power control pre-selection T6/pulsing output
  • G117   Power control pre-selection T7/pulsing output
  • G120   Axis transformation; orientation changing of the linear interpolation rotary axis
  • G121   Axis transformation; orientation change in a plane
  • G125   Electronic gearbox; plain teeth
  • G126   Electronic gearbox; helical gearing, axial
  • G127   Electronic gearbox; helical gearing, tangential
  • G128   Electronic gearbox; helical gearing, diagonal
  • G130   Axis transformation; programming of the type of the orientation change
  • G131   Axis transformation; programming of the type of the orientation change
  • G132   Axis transformation; programming of the type of the orientation change
  • G133   Zero lag thread cutting “on”
  • G134   Zero lag thread cutting “off”
  • G140   Axis transformation; orientation designation workpiece fixed coordinates
  • G141   Axis transformation; orientation designation active coordinates
  • G160   ART activation
  • G161   ART learning function for velocity factors “on”
  • G162   ART learning function deactivation
  • G163   ART learning function for acceleration factors
  • G164   ART learning function for acceleration changing
  • G165   Command filter “on”
  • G166   Command filter “off”
  • G170   Digital measuring signals; block transfer with hard stop
  • G171   Digital measuring signals; block transfer without hard stop
  • G172   Digital measuring signals; block transfer with smooth stop
  • G175   SERCOS-identification number “write”
  • G176   SERCOS-identification number “read”
  • G180   Axis transformation “off”
  • G181   Axis transformation “on” with not rotated coordinate system
  • G182   Axis transformation “on” with rotated/displaced coordinate system
  • G183   Axis transformation; definition of the coordinate system
  • G184   Axis transformation; programming tool dimensions
  • G186   Look ahead; corner acceleration; circle tolerance
  • G188   Activation of the positioning axes
  • G190   Diameter programming deactivation
  • G191   Diameter programming “on” and display of the contact point
  • G192   Diameter programming; only display contact point diameter
  • G193   Diameter programming; only display contact point actual axes center point
  • G200   Corner smoothing “off”
  • G201   Corner smoothing “on” with defined radius
  • G202   Corner smoothing “on” with defined corner tolerance
  • G203   Corner smoothing with defined radius up to maximum tolerance
  • G210   Power control axis selection/Channel 2
  • G211   Power control pre-selection V1, F1, T1/Channel 2
  • G212   Power control pre-selection V2, F2, T2/Channel 2
  • G213   Power control pre-selection V3, F3, T3/Channel 2
  • G214   Power control pre-selection T4/Channel 2
  • G215   Power control pre-selection T5/Channel 2
  • G216   Power control pre-selection T6/pulsing output/Channel 2
  • G217   Power control pre-selection T7/pulsing output/Channel 2
  • G220   Angled wheel transformation “off”
  • G221   Angled wheel transformation “on”
  • G222   Angled wheel transformation “on” but angled wheel moves before others
  • G223   Angled wheel transformation “on” but angled wheel moves after others
  • G265   Distance regulation – axis selection
  • G270   Turning finishing cycle
  • G271   Stock removal in turning
  • G272   Stock removal in facing
  • G274   Peck finishing cycle
  • G275   Outer diameter / internal diameter turning cycle
  • G276   Multiple pass threading cycle
  • G310   Power control axes selection /channel 3
  • G311   Power control pre-selection V1, F1, T1/channel 3
  • G312   Power control pre-selection V2, F2, T2/channel 3
  • G313   Power control pre-selection V3, F3, T3/channel 3
  • G314   Power control pre-selection T4/channel 3
  • G315   Power control pre-selection T5/channel 3
  • G316   Power control pre-selection T6/pulsing output/Channel 3
  • G317   Power control pre-selection T7/pulsing output/Channel 3

 

In conclusion, becoming well-versed on CNC G-Codes, along with other codes associated with CNCs is imperative in this day and age. By having up-to-speed knowledge of CNC codes, you could most definitely set yourself apart from the average Joe.