Category Archives: Fanuc

G Codes

G Codes

G Codes

As a generic name for a plain-text language in which CNC machine are able to understand, G-Codes are important to understand in the manufacturing, automation and engineering spaces. You can enter a G-Code manually if you wish, but you do not have to because of the CAD/CAM software’ abilities along with the machine controller.  G-Codes are not necessarily readable by humans, but it’s possible to look through the file and determine what is generally occurring.

In the factory automation space, nobody likes downtime and receiving error codes. While using CNCs (view FANUC CNC parts here), many professionals are faced with G Codes. By definition, a G Code is a computer code language that is used to guide CNC machine devices to perform specific motions. A few examples of specific motions would be:

  • canned cycles
  • work coordinates
  • several repetitive cycles.
G Codes: canned cycles-

Also referred to as a fixed cycle, canned cycles are ways to effectively and efficiently perform repetitive CNC machining operations. They automate specific machining functions. A few examples would be pocketing, threading, and drilling. A canned cycle is almost always stored as a pre-program in a machine’s controller. To learn more about canned cycles, check out this article courtesy of zero-divide.net.

G Codes: work coordinates-

The G Code coordinate pipeline goes something like this:

  • Unit conversion to metric
  • Convert from relative to absolute and polar to Cartesian: g90g91XYZ()
  • G52, G54, and G92 offsets
  • G51 scaling
  • G68 coordinate rotation

G-Code is the most popular programming language used for programming CNC machinery. Some G words alter the state of the machine so that it changes from cutting straight lines to cutting arcs. Other G words cause the interpretation of numbers as millimeters rather than inches. Some G words set or remove tool length or diameter offsets. Be sure to check out our article covering FANUC CNC Codes here.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Tool Parameters, Feeds, and Speeds

Listed below are some easily-understood G-code commands in which are used for setting the speed, feed, and tool parameters.

F= Feed

The F command’s purpose is to set the feed rate. Keep in mind, the machine operates at the specified speed rate when G1 is used, G1 commands are set to operate at the set F value.

An error is likely to occur if the feed rate (F) isn’t set once before the first G1 call.  Here is an example:

  • G1 F1500 X100 Y100

S= Spindle Speed

The S command’s purpose is to set the spindle speed. The Spindle speed is almost always set in RPMs (revolutions per minute). Here is an example:

  • S10000

T= Tool

The T command’s purpose is paired with M6 in order to display the tool number to be used for cutting the current file. Here is an example:

  • M6 T1
Below is a complete listing of G Codes:
  • G00     Rapid traverse 
  • G01     Linear interpolation with feed rate
  • G02     Circular interpolation (clockwise)
  • G03     Circular interpolation (counterclockwise)
  • G2/G3   Helical interpolation
  • G04     Dwell time in milliseconds
  • G05     Spline definition
  • G06     Spline interpolation
  • G07     Tangential circular interpolation, Helix interpolation, Polygon interpolation, Feedrate interpolation
  • G08     Ramping function at block transition / Look ahead “off”
  • G09     No ramping function at block transition / Look ahead “on”
  • G10     Stop dynamic block preprocessing
  • G11     Stop interpolation during block preprocessing
  • G12     Circular interpolation (CW) with radius
  • G13     Circular interpolation (CCW) with radius
  • G14     Polar coordinate programming, absolute
  • G15     Polar coordinate programming, relative
  • G16     Definition of the pole point of the polar coordinate system
  • G17     Selection of the X, Y plane
  • G18     Selection of the Z, X plane
  • G19     Selection of the Y, Z plane
  • G20     Selection of a freely definable plane
  • G21     Parallel axes “on”
  • G22     Parallel axes “off”
  • G24     Safe zone programming; lower limit values
  • G25     Safe zone programming; upper limit values
  • G26     Safe zone programming “off”
  • G27     Safe zone programming “on”
  • G33     Thread cutting with constant pitch
  • G34     Thread cutting with dynamic pitch
  • G35     Oscillation configuration
  • G38     Mirror imaging “on”
  • G39     Mirror imaging “off”
  • G40     Path compensations “off”
  • G41     Path compensation left of the workpiece contour
  • G42     Path compensation right of the workpiece contour
  • G43     Path compensation left of the workpiece contour with altered approach
  • G44     Path compensation right of the workpiece contour with altered approach
  • G50     Scaling
  • G51     Part rotation; programming in degrees
  • G52     Part rotation; programming in radians
  • G53     Zero offset off
  • G54     Zero offset #1
  • G55     Zero offset #2
  • G56     Zero offset #3
  • G57     Zero offset #4
  • G58     Zero offset #5
  • G59     Zero offset #6
  • G63 Feed/spindle override not active
  • G66 Feed/spindle override active
  • G70     Inch format active
  • G71     Metric format active
  • G72     Interpolation with precision stop “off”
  • G73     Interpolation with precision stop “on”
  • G74     Move to home position
  • G75     Curvature function activation
  • G76     Curvature acceleration limit
  • G78     Normalcy function “on” (rotational axis orientation)
  • G79     Normalcy function “off”
G80 – G89 for milling applications:
  • G80     Canned cycle “off”
  • G81     Drilling to final depth canned cycle
  • G82     Spot facing with dwell time canned cycle
  • G83     Deep hole drilling canned cycle
  • G84     Tapping or Thread cutting with balanced chuck canned cycle
  • G85     Reaming canned cycle
  • G86     Boring canned cycle
  • G87     Reaming with measuring stop canned cycle
  • G88     Boring with spindle stop canned cycle
  • G89     Boring with intermediate stop canned cycle
G81 – G88 for cylindrical grinding applications:
  • G81     Reciprocation without plunge
  • G82     Incremental face grinding
  • G83     Incremental plunge grinding
  • G84     Multi-pass face grinding
  • G85     Multi-pass diameter grinding
  • G86     Shoulder grinding
  • G87     Shoulder grinding with face plunge
  • G88     Shoulder grinding with diameter plunge
  • G90     Absolute programming
  • G91     Incremental programming
  • G92     Position preset
  • G93     Constant tool circumference velocity “on” (grinding wheel)
  • G94     Feed in mm / min (or inch / min)
  • G95     Feed per revolution (mm / rev or inch / rev)
  • G96     Constant cutting speed “on”
  • G97     Constant cutting speed “off”
  • G98     Positioning axis signal to PLC
  • G99     Axis offset
  • G100   Polar transformation “off”
  • G101   Polar transformation “on”
  • G102   Cylinder barrel transformation “on”; cartesian coordinate system
  • G103   Cylinder barrel transformation “on,” with real-time-radius compensation (RRC)
  • G104   Cylinder barrel transformation with centerline migration (CLM) and RRC
  • G105   Polar transformation “on” with polar axis selections
  • G106   Cylinder barrel transformation “on” polar-/cylinder-coordinates
  • G107   Cylinder barrel transformation “on” polar-/cylinder-coordinates with RRC
  • G108   Cylinder barrel transformation polar-/cylinder-coordinates with CLM and RRC
  • G109   Axis transformation programming of the tool depth
  • G110   Power control axis selection/channel 1
  • G111   Power control pre-selection V1, F1, T1/channel 1 (Voltage, Frequency, Time)
  • G112   Power control pre-selection V2, F2, T2/channel 1
  • G113   Power control pre-selection V3, F3, T3/channel 1
  • G114   Power control pre-selection T4/channel 1
  • G115   Power control pre-selection T5/channel 1
  • G116   Power control pre-selection T6/pulsing output
  • G117   Power control pre-selection T7/pulsing output
  • G120   Axis transformation; orientation changing of the linear interpolation rotary axis
  • G121   Axis transformation; orientation change in a plane
  • G125   Electronic gearbox; plain teeth
  • G126   Electronic gearbox; helical gearing, axial
  • G127   Electronic gearbox; helical gearing, tangential
  • G128   Electronic gearbox; helical gearing, diagonal
  • G130   Axis transformation; programming of the type of the orientation change
  • G131   Axis transformation; programming of the type of the orientation change
  • G132   Axis transformation; programming of the type of the orientation change
  • G133   Zero lag thread cutting “on”
  • G134   Zero lag thread cutting “off”
  • G140   Axis transformation; orientation designation workpiece fixed coordinates
  • G141   Axis transformation; orientation designation active coordinates
  • G160   ART activation
  • G161   ART learning function for velocity factors “on”
  • G162   ART learning function deactivation
  • G163   ART learning function for acceleration factors
  • G164   ART learning function for acceleration changing
  • G165   Command filter “on”
  • G166   Command filter “off”
  • G170   Digital measuring signals; block transfer with hard stop
  • G171   Digital measuring signals; block transfer without hard stop
  • G172   Digital measuring signals; block transfer with smooth stop
  • G175   SERCOS-identification number “write”
  • G176   SERCOS-identification number “read”
  • G180   Axis transformation “off”
  • G181   Axis transformation “on” with not rotated coordinate system
  • G182   Axis transformation “on” with rotated/displaced coordinate system
  • G183   Axis transformation; definition of the coordinate system
  • G184   Axis transformation; programming tool dimensions
  • G186   Look ahead; corner acceleration; circle tolerance
  • G188   Activation of the positioning axes
  • G190   Diameter programming deactivation
  • G191   Diameter programming “on” and display of the contact point
  • G192   Diameter programming; only display contact point diameter
  • G193   Diameter programming; only display contact point actual axes center point
  • G200   Corner smoothing “off”
  • G201   Corner smoothing “on” with defined radius
  • G202   Corner smoothing “on” with defined corner tolerance
  • G203   Corner smoothing with defined radius up to maximum tolerance
  • G210   Power control axis selection/Channel 2
  • G211   Power control pre-selection V1, F1, T1/Channel 2
  • G212   Power control pre-selection V2, F2, T2/Channel 2
  • G213   Power control pre-selection V3, F3, T3/Channel 2
  • G214   Power control pre-selection T4/Channel 2
  • G215   Power control pre-selection T5/Channel 2
  • G216   Power control pre-selection T6/pulsing output/Channel 2
  • G217   Power control pre-selection T7/pulsing output/Channel 2
  • G220   Angled wheel transformation “off”
  • G221   Angled wheel transformation “on”
  • G222   Angled wheel transformation “on” but angled wheel moves before others
  • G223   Angled wheel transformation “on” but angled wheel moves after others
  • G265   Distance regulation – axis selection
  • G270   Turning finishing cycle
  • G271   Stock removal in turning
  • G272   Stock removal in facing
  • G274   Peck finishing cycle
  • G275   Outer diameter / internal diameter turning cycle
  • G276   Multiple pass threading cycle
  • G310   Power control axes selection /channel 3
  • G311   Power control pre-selection V1, F1, T1/channel 3
  • G312   Power control pre-selection V2, F2, T2/channel 3
  • G313   Power control pre-selection V3, F3, T3/channel 3
  • G314   Power control pre-selection T4/channel 3
  • G315   Power control pre-selection T5/channel 3
  • G316   Power control pre-selection T6/pulsing output/Channel 3
  • G317   Power control pre-selection T7/pulsing output/Channel 3

 

In conclusion, becoming well-versed on CNC G-Codes, along with other codes associated with CNCs is imperative in this day and age. By having up-to-speed knowledge of CNC codes, you could most definitely set yourself apart from the average Joe.

 

FANUC CNC Codes

FANUC CNC Codes

fanuc cnc

In the world of automation, whether we’re talking about factory or plant automation, understanding how to operate and maintain a CNC (view FANUC CNC parts)  is imperative. Several businesses and companies suffer from dreaded downtime because a team isn’t well-rounded; many team members may know how to manage machine operators, etc., but are unaware of how to operate a CNC themselves. For a manager, knowing and understanding exactly what to look for to avoid an operating issue starts with understanding the basics of CNC machining and programming.

CNCs originally started coming about in the late 1940s, not long after World War II as NCs (Numerical Controls). They were engineered to be a reliable, cost-effective way to manufacture and design an increased amount of parts for the aircraft industry. Based on already-existing modified tools equipped with motors that manipulated the controls, CNCs were quickly and abruptly built up with computers, both digital and analog. As time has gone on, CNCs have continued to evolve as technology evolves.

Early Numerical Controls initially lacked computers. They also lacked calculating ability, which is absolutely unheard of in today’s world. After the 1960s, numerical controls eventually gained calculating and computer functions. Onboard processing became feasible and, as a result, CNC machines came about. Via the initiation of CNCs, a handful of features were then attainable, fortunately, including canned cycles, tool length compensation, sub programming, radial compensation and tool diameter.

Preparatory Codes

NC and CNC G Codes are referred to as preparatory codes. By preparing the machine to perform a specific function like, for example, rapid travel G0 / G00, the preparatory process is important to understand, as all of the stages of production are.

Miscellaneous Codes

NC / CNC M codes are known as miscellaneous codes.  CNC M codes basically perform on and off functions such as:

  • stopping processing of CNC code M0 / M00
  • turning the spindle on M3 / M0 or M3 / M03
  • stopping the spindle M5 / M05
  • turning coolant on M8 / M08

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

G Code and M Code

The ANSI standard for G code and M code programming is ANSI/EIA 274D-1988. The ISO standard for G code and M code programming is ISO 6983. There is a new and different standard ISO 14649 also known as the STEP-NC standard that addresses NC and CNC programming using the enhanced features of CAD and/or CAM software.

Machine tool builders are not required to adhere to standards and every so often create variations to standard G codes and M codes. Occasionally design different, unique alternatives to orthodox G codes and M codes. Typically, the majority of CNC G codes are considered modal, which means they stay active until they’re changed. Along with understanding CNC codes, feel free to view another one of our articles focused on choosing a CNC to become as well-versed with CNCs as possible.

Choosing a CNC

fanuc cnc

Choosing a CNC

Buying and building a new CNC (view FANUC CNC parts) can be challenging and often nerve-racking. Regardless of which space you’re in, downtime needs to be avoided as much as humanly (or robotically) possible.  Check out our points to avoid common CNC issues.

One of the most common reasons for CNC downtime would be low build quality. Balls screws,  linear guides, and linear boxes need to be built with high quality to avoid downtime. Often, unfortunately, CNC machines are built using several high-quality parts, and a handful of cheaper, lower-quality parts. Although a machine may consist of mainly high-quality, top-of-the-line parts, issues are still likely to occur due to the low-quality parts. A CNC machine, like most pieces of machinery, is ‘only as strong as its weakest link’.

By taking a look at the tool changer’s location, you can usually determine if its location will be an issue or not. Faulty tool changer designs are common in the CNC world. If it’s hard to get to the tool changer to, for example, change and replace the cam followers, then another design alternative may be best. Don’t be afraid to research other up-to-par designs and designs that have worked well for others in the past.

Avoid poor-quality spindles at all costs, as they’re everywhere and often result in issues. Take a good look at the spindles’ bearings. If they’re plentiful and look larger-than-average, you’re good to go. If they’re lacking in size, research instances where spindles’ bushings have been an issue to create your standard. Along with that, take a look at the horsepower of them; if their horsepower is below average, avoid at all costs. Stalling may occur with low horsepower spindles, which often results in many others with other parts on top of the spindle. Also, be sure to check out our article focused on maintaining automation machine tools. Maintenance is unavoidable and compiling maintenance with unnecessary rebuilds is unpractical and will likely result in downtime and lost profit.

Tolerance of CNCs should be tight. The tighter the tolerance, the longer the life expectancy generally is. Tighter tolerance will also result in an overall smoother operation. MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Factory Automation and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Advances

fanuc robotics

 Factory Automation and Machine-to-Machine (M2M) Advances

As technology evolves, automation has become more and more prevalent in the factory automation space. Machine-to-machine enables private and exclusive communication and control over sensors, cameras, industrial equipment, robotics (check out our FANUC Robotics parts) and essentially anything else. Manufactory facilities and several other remote systems are managed much more easily with machine-to-machine advances in communication.

Initially, with industrial and enterprise applications as a focal point, machine-to-machine communication was easily defined and used for a limited amount of tasks. Nowadays, there are many fewer limitations associated with the machine-to-machine communication.

Pressured to lower costs and improve speed and overall efficiency, factory automation companies are often in an uncomfortable spot. While using high-end, sophisticated automation applications and tools, more real-time data must be obtained to streamline more of the day-to-day operations and tasks. Implementing machine-to-machine solutions can help with operational efficiency gains, time and cost savings, and performance optimization.

From a cellular standpoint, machine-to-machine solutions enable integration of environmental controls into a single system, and to unify with security and video surveillance systems. All and all, companies are able to secure several properties from anywhere they wish to, even as they fine-tune power efficiency and decrease operating expenses.

Due to the immense increase of machine-operated plants in companies who rely on keeping critical assets and functions performing optimally, several companies are exploring options associated with a machine-to-machine communication. Of the many benefits, the fact that it’s able to deliver remote access to gather real-time process data to cut operation costs is often one of the most well-recognized. The ability to identify and rectify production line faults, or design and implement preventative maintenance strategies, for example, is what machine-to-machine communication is designed for.

Involving data exchange over the telephone line or via the internal with machines, plants, computers for issue detection, diagnostics, and repair, teleservice is an imperative aspect of machine-to-machine communication. Offering an optimal answer to diagnose distant systems, teleservice is becoming more and more popular and is not going anywhere.

Telecontrol, another aspect of machine-to-machine communication, deals with connections of distant process stations to one or more central control systems. Many networks, both public and private,  can be used for communication used to control. For these diverse applications and businesses, cellular M2M connectivity can address many business and technical challenges and enable important benefits.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC Robotics parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Additionally, M2M systems can be designed to withstand harsh environmental conditions and easily manage and control connected devices across the country or around the world. M2M systems provide flexibility to move equipment as needed, or bring up and tear down systems quickly for temporary or seasonal deployments. By using modern M2M management and application platforms, and taking care to choose platforms designed to meet real-world requirements, organizations can take full advantage of the M2M revolution.

In case you were wondering, machine-to-machine systems are indeed designed to withstand environmental conditions and easily control connected devices in any location. They are flexible and can move equipment with ease. In order to use machine-to-machine communication optimally, look into management and application platforms. Click here to view our article on IT and Robotics.

Boosting Factory Automation Productivity

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Boosting Factory Automation Productivity

In the factory automation space, productivity is much more than an imperative management concept; it is a scalable tool that drives employees and processes to be functioning at their best. In order to keep employees on track and enable goals to be met in the workplace, fine-tuning processes and running a ‘tight ship’ as far as time management is concerned is considered best practice.

As far as work is concerned, understanding where to start is the first, and often, most difficult step. Understand what may set your company back, whether it be a worn down motor (such as a FANUC CNC Motor) not performing up-to-par, or a poorly-maintained Servo Amp (such as a FANUC CNC Servo Amp).  Missing expectations due to a faulty machine is avoidable, as seen in this article focusing on Maintaining Automation Machine Tools.

To ensure your teams’ insights aren’t hindered, consider documenting priority-oriented processes such as customer service, client retention, and cutting operation costs, that way, more focus can be put toward improving workflow, coaching employees and pinpointing other areas that could be improved on. Take industry benchmarks into consideration; they can be used as a point of reference to determine if an area can be improved in, or if it’s already up-to-par. Along with documenting the aforementioned processes, keeping track of progress and growth can also aid in fine-tuning.

In order to remain on the same page with employees, ask for their buy-in and try to understand where they’re coming from. They may help shed light on problematic areas such as why certain departments aren’t working as closely together as they could be, or if downtime could be minimized by having two departments working together more effectively. By making employees feel valued and trusted, a company is less likely to run into honesty issues, communication issues and/or issues with collaboration. The foundation for productive operations starts with an honest, well-communicating team. Teams need to have an in-depth understanding of where they’re expected to add value and, of course, what the company is working toward as a whole. Eliminating clutter in order to have a well-focused and productive team is an achievement that most of those in the factory machine automation space don’t lose sight of. MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

These days, there are shortcuts and tools for essentially any and every niche. Many of those in the machine and factory automation space are focusing on robotics (see FANUC Robotics parts) to explore ways to automate processes in hope of enhancing productivity. Be sure to stay ‘in the loop’ when it comes to tools that could enhance one’s productivity through collaboration, etc.

 

Gathering Information Before Considering a Repair

fanuc repair

Gathering Information Before Considering a Repair

Downtime is inevitable when it comes to machine automation. When production stops, orders will likely stack up quickly, hitting start on the ‘profits lost’ clock. After the failed part is identified, many machine automation professionals would lean towards shipping the flawed part to get serviced as soon as humanly possible. While MRO Electric and Supply appreciates the business, we want to ensure our customers are as well-informed as possible and able to fix issues of their own, is able to.

By grouping observations together and looking at them closely,  many of those in the machine automation space may find that the issue can be fixed internally, rather than sending a part out to another party. Be sure to press the in-house employees for details, as someone on the clock may have witnessed the failure first-hand and would be able to provide more intimate and valuable insight as far as what may have happened. Any way to avoid a future issue is worth exploring!

As many know, factory automation machines consist of several interconnected parts and components. Because of this, it’s important not to overlook related issues that have occurred or may occur. If a drive (such as a FANUC Robotics Drive)  were to fail, best practice would be to send it along with the motor it’s connected with to preventative maintenance to be checked together. By consulting with the machines’ operators, you may find that other parts could be sent to preventative maintenance along with motor (such as a FANUC CNC motor)  and drive. Keep in mind, certified experts will likely be able to point machine details out that others may not recognize or think of. Nobody wants to run into an issue, fix said issue, and run into it again, due to lack of attention to detail.

Whether you have only two wires to unhook or twelve hundred, document everything. When you uninstall the damaged unit, label your wires. Be sure what you are using is sturdy and will remain affixed. Do not use tape that will slip off with grease or dust. Also, take before, during and after pictures of the operation. These pictures can save you from a tremendous headache later on. Also, when possible, make sure to save any parameters and record any settings before the unit has been taken out of service.

By documenting all of the parts or wires that had to be disassembled as specifically as possible, you would likely be avoiding many headaches. Nobody wants to disassemble a section of a machine, later to discover a wire or bolt is misplaced, which would lead to dreaded downtime that everyone in the factory automation and manufacturing space dispises. Don’t be afraid to take a video or several photos of the disassembling process; in-depth videos or even photos are often invaluable to refer back to, especially when in a rush or a busy time of the year.

In order to make your time count with the service center, be sure to prepare your explanation on a written or typed document. If there’s a possibility of more than one employee communicating with the service center, ensure they’re up-to-speed with all details that may be of help to fixing the issue or issues at hand. MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished parts available now, and also offers repair pricing. Be sure to check out our core exchange program to learn how to save. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Be sure to avoid shipping damage by packing the part or parts securely and appropriately. Nobody wants a quick and painless fix to turn into an extended fix due to laziness or lack of initiative to research correct packaging processes. Most units need 3-5 inches of packaging insulation on all sides, to ensure rough handling won’t damage the part or parts. Check out our other articles focused on robotics here.

 

 

 

Workforce Automation and Robots

FANUC Robotics

Workforce Automation and Robots

Automation has been in mind for not just decades, but centuries. Whether we’re talking about those who worked in flour mills or those who dealt with windmills, automated processes have always been on inventors’ minds. While automation would technically result in job losses, the increased prevalence of robots and robotics parts (such as FANUC Robotic Parts found here)  in the manufacturing, packaging, and engineering space would result in interesting implications for consumers, employees, companies, organizations, etc.

Does Workforce Automation Result in Job Losses?

Many are convinced that automation will come and take over a majority of the work done by humans in the next few decades, and some feel as though their jobs are safe. Let us take China for example. China is one of the most dominant manufacturing hubs in the world, supplying a huge chunk of the world’s electronics products. Over the past few years, Chinas’ factories cut human workforce by an astounding average of 50%, due to the increased prevalence of robots.

Are there Advantages of Workforce Automation?

Although there is definitely a negative side of workforce automation, do positive sides exist? Customers could experience, to an extent, cheaper and more effective services and products. This would be due to the cost savings of the autonomous robotics, which yield a one-time fee along with other basic upkeep costs. Lower production costs would also make it possible to build items in the U.S. vs overseas, which many would prefer.

 Automation Limits?

There are limits to mostly everything, and automation is no exception. Short product life cycles that quickly become obsolete and ability to entertain fully-custom projects do not fit into an automation system. For example, paying for a large number of robots to build an electronic product that will become obsolete in less than a year would not be a smart decision from a business standpoint. The ability to be flexible and custom is imperative when concerning several products in several different markets.

What does Second Machine Age Mean?

Robotics in machine automation is becoming a larger part of the workforce as time goes on. Some companies plan to simply increase production levels with the help of robots and robotics parts while keeping their employee count the same and reassigning their workers to other positions within the company. With the addition of robots and robotic parts in the workplace, workers will be needed to maintain robots, calibrate and monitor them, analyze data and more.

The rise of robots and robotic parts is unavoidable in several niches. Today’s technological prosperity is changing tomorrow’s workforce for good. MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC Robotics parts available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Lastly, be sure to check out our articles on boosting factory automation productivity here.

LCD Retrofitting Benefits

LCD Retrofit

LCD Retrofitting Benefits

 

Part 1: CRT to LCD Retrofits

Many professionals in the automation space that have a CNC Machine (such as FANUC CNC parts found here) in their shop deal with pesky issues from time-to-time. One common issue for those who use CNC machines would be CRT monitors that begin showing their age. Several of our customers have been in this situation, feel as though they’re left with two choices: repair their CRT monitors, or replace them.

To be clear, those are not the only two options. The main reasons:

1.) it’s often time-consuming to pinpoint a CRT Replacement part.

2.) It is not cost-effective to have the CRT monitor repaired.

 Our alternative to the two options: an LCD retrofit (found in FANUC Displays and Controls) .

The advantages of retrofitting or upgrading a CRT monitor with an LCD retrofit are:

  • Improved screen visibility
  • Increased life of CNC Machine
  • Decrease amount of electricity used during operation

Part 2: Floppy Disk to USB Drive Retrofits

Another outdated piece we have encountered in the machine automation space? a floppy disk.  

Floppy disks are still in use today for some, often causing issues. By implementing an updated, customized USB flash drive, several issues can likely be avoided. What is now a slow and obsolete tool, the floppy disk is still in use with some of our clients and causing problems.  Our recommendation is a new custom-built USB flash drive solution.

Upgrading to a USB drive is usually a straightforward process. No changes or system configurations are necessary during this process, and yes, it will work on CNC machines and other devices that still use the floppy drive.

Nobody likes the costs of downtime including those in the machine automation space.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC products available, including LCD Retrofit products. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Perks of Operating Motors With Drives 

Perks of Operating Motors With Drives

drives and motors

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished motors and drives available. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Adjustable speed drives (ASDs), or variable-speed drives (VSDs) is used to describe equipment that assists to control the speed of machinery. Usually, they are using in mechanical equipment powered by motors.

The drives offer truthful electrical motor control enabling motor speeds to be increased, decreased and maintained.

Save On Energy:

Due to energy consumption, centrifugal fan and pump loads operated with versatile speed drives are reduced. The horsepower needed to operate the fan is cut by a much larger factor if the speed of the fan is cut in thirds or in half. As everyone knows, energy savings are what machine automation professionals yearn for.

Controlled torque limit:

By using an adjustable speed drive, machinery can be protected from any damage that may occur. The specific amount of torque applied by the motor to a load is able to be fully controlled.

Controlled Starting Current:

Usually when an ac motor is started “across the line,” it takes about as seven-to-eight times to start the motor and load.

 By utilizing an adjustable speed drive, the considerably reduced starting current expands the life of an ac motor. The benefits are less wear & tear on the motor which translates to extend motor life and less motor rewinds.
Governed Stopping:

Governed stopping backs up diminish product loss because of machine-driven wear and tear attributed to shocks to the process.

Reverse Operation:

The requirement for a reversing started is mitigated in regards to utilizing an adjustable speed drive. The reason being is the output phases to the motor can be morphed electronically. Removing the reversing starter terminates its upkeep expense while also minimizing panel space.

Decreased Power Demand on Start:

To begin an AC motor across the line, one is going to need much more power compared to beginning an adjustable speed drive. This is only the case at the start because the power to run the motor at load would be the same regardless of its variable speed.

Adjustable Operating Speed:

Process automation and implementing changes in a process is allowed due to deploying an adjustable speed drive. This also enables beginning at a shortened speed and allows remote acclimation of speed by process controllers.

 

Removal of mechanical drive components:

By using an adjustable speed drive, the likelihood of needing costly mechanical drive components like gearboxes can be mitigated. The AC drive is able to transport the high and/or low speed required by the load with a consistent speed between the motor and load because it’s able to function with an infinite variable speed.

 

FANUC Panel Keyboard Keys Overview

FANUC Panel Keyboard Keys Overview

FANUC Panel Keyboard Keys Overview

FANUC Alarm keys: These keys are located on the machine panel that displays alarm intelligence for the machine panel. MRO Electric has several FANUC part numbers starting with A06B, A20B, and A16B in-stock here. These keys differ from the alarm keys correlated with the control panel.

FANUC Auto key: This is the key on the CNC machine (including the A16B, A17B & A20B product line) that reshapes the operation mode to automatic. Automatic mode authorizes an operator to contact and execute a part program stored in memory. Automatic mode is called memory mode on some CNC controls at times.

A safety function that determines if the tool has moved beyond its set boundaries. Forbidden zones can be programmed to specify areas where the tool can and cannot enter.

Page keys: The up and down arrow keys located on the MDI keypad (A20B ) that allow an operator to move through various screens and fields one page at a time.

Parentheses: ( ). Curved brackets used to separate program text information from CNC program commands.

Part program: A series of instructions used by a CNC machine to perform the necessary sequence of operations to machine a specific workpiece.

POS: A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the position screen that shows axis locations.

Power off: The red button on a CNC control panel that shuts off power to the control.

Power on: The green button on a CNC control panel that provides power to the control.

PRGRM: A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the program screen and blocks of the current part program.

Program edit keys: Keys located on the MDI keypad that allow an operator to alter, insert, or delete data from stored memory.

Program protect switch: A switch located on the machine control panel that allows the operator to secure current program information. The program protect switch prevents accidental or intentional deletion of programs in memory.

Program source keys: The group of keys on the operator panel that control how part programs are used. The AUTO, EDIT, and MDI keys that comprise the program source keys are distinct machine modes.

Rapid traverse: The movement of machine components at the fastest possible rate of travel. Rapid traverse motion merely requires an endpoint for the movement.

Reference position: A fixed position on a machine tool to which the tool can easily be moved by the reference position return function.

Reset key: A key located on the MDI keypad that stops all machine motion and places the program cursor at the top of the current program.

Shift key: A key located on the MDI keypad that allows an operator to access letters and special characters found on the address keys.

SINGL BLOCK key: A key that activates the single block feature on the GE FANUC 0-C control. The single block function runs the program one block at a time to prove out the program.

Soft keys: Keys located directly below the display screen that have different purposes depending on which function key has been chosen. The function of each soft key is visible on the display screen between brackets.

SP: A key that allows an operator to enter a space when manually entering data.

Spindle jog key: A key located on the machine panel that rotates the spindle incrementally in either a clockwise or counterclockwise direction.

Spindle keys: The area of the CNC machine control that allows the operator to manually control the rotation of the spindle in a clockwise or counter-clockwise direction. The spindle keys include CW (clockwise) and CCW (counter-clockwise), STOP, and JOG.

TEACH key: A key that changes the operation mode of a CNC machine to allow tool positions obtained by manual operation to be stored in memory.

Tool limit switch: The component that prevents a tool from exceeding the set direction limit on an axis. The tool limit switch detects overtravel.

Zero return key: Also known as the home key, zero return automatically moves the spindle to the machine zero position.

Auto mode: Auto mode is the mode that enables an operator to contact and execute a part program stored in the machine.

AUX/Graph: AUX/Graph is a function key located on the MDI keypad (A20B) that demonstrates the graphics screen.

Axis/direction keys: Axis/direction keys are located in the area of the machine control that enables an operator to select a specific axis.

BLOCK DELET key: BLOCK DELET key is a machine control that delivers the option of leaving out a predetermined series of program blocks. A block delete authorizes the operator to run two versions of the identical program.

Brackets: [ ]. Punctuation marks used to distinguish CNC program commands from macro statements.

CAN key: The CAN key is located on the MDI keypad that backspaces the cursor to remove the last character entered. It also drops any program block that is highlighted during a block edit.

Control Panel: The Control Panel is a group of controls on a CNC machine (A02B, A16B, A17B & A20B) that runs, store, and edits the commands of a part program and other coordinate details.

Coolant keys: Coolant Keys are the area of the CNC machine control that enables an operator to switch the coolant on and off, manually or automatically, during a program cycle.

Cursor keys: Cursor keys are the up and down arrow keys located on the MDI keypad that authorize an operator to move through numerous screens and fields in the control, edit and search for CNC programs, and move the cursor through the program or screen options.

Cycle start: Cycle start is the control button used to initiate a program or continue a program that has been previously stopped.

Cycle stop: The control button used to bring a program to a temporary halt. Also known as feed hold, cycle stop pauses tool feed but does not pause spindle movement.

DGNOS/PARAM: A function key located on the MDI keypad that demonstrates the diagnostics and parameters screens.

Display screen: The main screen of the machine that displays urgent information for the operator.

DRY RUN key: A key that activates the dry run feature on a CNC machine (example: . The dry run function checks a program quickly without cutting parts.

EDIT key: The key on the CNC machine that modifies the operation mode to edit. Edit mode allows an operator to make changes to a part program and store those changes.

EDIT mode: The mode that enables an operator to modify a part program and store those changes.

Emergency stop: Used for emergencies only, the control button that automatically shuts down all machine functions.

End-of-block key: EOB. A signal that marks the end of a part program block. An end-of-block signal is symbolized by a semicolon (;) in a part program.

Execution keys: The area of the CNC machine control that enables an operator to begin or end a part program. The execution keys include CYCLE START and CYCLE STOP.

Feed hold: The control button used to pause a program. Also known as cycle stop, feed hold pauses tool feed but does not stop spindle movement.

Function keys: Keys located on the MDI keypad that allows the operator to choose between contrasting tasks.

HOME key: A key that automatically moves the spindle to the machine zero position. The HOME key is called the zero return key on some machines at times.

Input buffer: A temporary location on a computer that holds all incoming information before it continues to the CPU for processing.

Input key: A key located on the MDI keypad that enables an operator to enter data into the input buffer. This key is also used to input data from an input/output unit.

Jog feed: In JOG mode, the continuous movement of a tool in a direction along a selected axis.

JOG key: The area of the machine control that allows an operator to move a selected axis. Jog keys are often called axis direction keys.

Machine function keys: The area of the control panel that allows an operator to perform different functions depending on what display or mode is selected. The machine function keys include SINGL BLOCK, BLOCK DELET, and DRY RUN.

Machine panel: The group of controls on a CNC machine that allow an operator to control machine components manually. Sometimes called the operator panel.

Machine zero: The position located at the farthest possible distance in a positive direction along the machine axes. Machine zero is permanently set for each particular CNC machine.

Manual data input keypad: The MDI keypad is located on the control panel and houses the address, numeric, and navigation keys.

Manual pulse generator: A circular handwheel on a CNC machine that can move a tool incrementally along an axis. On some machines, the MPG is known as the “handle.”

Manual pulse generator keys: Keys located on the machine panel that allow the operator to move the tool incrementally along an axis.

MDI key: The key on the CNC machine that changes the operation mode to manual data input mode. Manual data input mode lets an operator enter and execute program data without disturbing stored data.

MDI mode: An operation mode that lets an operator enter and execute program data without disturbing stored data.

MPG keys: The keys on the operator panel that control the size of incremental movement of the manual pulse generator.

No. key: A key that allows an operator to enter a numerical value into the input buffer. The SHIFT key must be used with the No. key.

Numeric keys: Keys located on the MDI keypad that allow an operator to enter numbers, a minus sign, and a decimal point into the control. These keys also contain the CAN key, manual JOG arrow keys, the EOB key, the BLOCK DELET, and the right and left cursor move keys.

Offset register: Area of the machine control that holds tool geometry, wear, and work offset settings.

OFSET: A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays tool offsets and settings.

OFSET MESUR key: A key on the CNC machine control panel that allows the operator to determine and set a tool offset. It measures the current coordinate value and the coordinate value of a command, and uses the difference as the offset value. If the offset value is already known, pressing the OFSET MESUR key moves the tool to the specified offset position.

Operation keys: The keys located on the operator panel that allow an operator to move tools and set offsets.

Operation mode keys: The AUTO, EDIT, and MDI keys that change the operation mode of the CNC machine.

Operator panel: The group of controls on a CNC machine that allow an operator to control machine components manually. Sometimes called the machine panel.

OPR/ALARM: A function key located on the MDI keypad that displays the alarm screen.

Output/start key: A key located on the MDI keypad that allows an operator to start an automatic operation and output data into an input/output unit.

Override: A machine control component that adjusts programmed values such as speed and feed rate by a certain percentage during operation.

Over-travel check: A safety function that determines if the tool has moved beyond its set boundaries. Forbidden zones can be programmed to specify areas where the tool can and cannot enter.

 

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished FANUC CNC parts available now such as motors, servo amps, spindle ampsdisplays and controls, power supplies, I/O modules,  and PCBs.

We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.