Category Archives: Modicon Quantum

Modicon PLC History

Modicon PLC History

Modicon PLC History

Richard E. Morley, also known as Dick, was an American electrical engineer. He was an employee at Bedford and Associates, located in Massachusetts. He is most commonly known for his involvement with the production of the first Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) for General Motors and the Modicon in 1968. General Motors Company, often referred to as GM, is an American multinational corporation that is headquartered in Detroit, Michigan that engineers, manufactures, markets and distributes vehicles and vehicle parts and sells financial services.

Known as an author, educator, influencer and specialized engineer, Morleys’ accomplishments and contributions have earned him numerous awards from families such as ISA (the instrumentation systems and automation society), Inc. Magazine, Franklin Institute, SME (the Society of Manufacturing Engineers), and the Engineering Society of Detroit. SME offers the Richard E. Morley Outstanding Young Manufacturing Engineer Award for outstanding technical accomplishments in the manufacturing space by engineers age 35 and younger.

Schneider Electric currently owns the Modicon brand of PLCs. The PLC has been recognized as a major advancement in the automation space and has had an unprecedented impact on the manufacturing community as a whole. PLCs were designed to replace re-wiring and hard-wired control panels with software program changes when production updates were necessary. Before PLCs came about, several relays, drum sequencers, cam timers and closed-loop controllers were used to manufacture vehicles and vehicle parts. Re-wiring the relays and other necessary components was a very in-depth and costly process, but clearly worth the effort. The Modicon 084 PLC was modeled to be programmed in ‘ladder logic’ which had the look of the schematic diagrams of relay logic it was replacing.  This made the transition to PLCs easier for engineers and other professionals in the manufacturing space.  The automotive industry is still one of, if not the largest users of PLCs today. MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished Modicon parts available including the Modicon Quantum series. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

The Modicon PLC Timeline

A few years later, in the 1970’s, dialogue between PLCs came about. Introduced as the first industrial communications network, Modbus was based on a Slave/Master architecture that used messaging to communicate between Modbus nodes. All and all, a lacking standardization made PLC communications a nightmare.

In the  1980’s, General Electric made an effort to regiment the interconnection of devices from several manufacturers with MAP (manufacturing automation protocol). PLC programming software was also created to operate on personal as well as professional computers in order to remove the need for dedicated programming terminals or handheld programmers.

As years have gone on, PLCs have evolved as technology evolves. Nowadays, they include process, motion, and distributed control systems, as well as complex networking. Equivalent to an average, run-of-the-mill desktop computer, PLCs have capacities for data handling storage and impressive processing power.

Repairing your Modicon Magelis HMI

Any amount of downtime is too much for most companies. Parts will break from time to time, and repairs will be necessary. Here at MRO Electric and Supply we are dedicated to providing the best service making sure that your downtime is minimal. Human Interface Terminals(HMIs) are a crucial part of any automation process nowadays, so it is important to make sure it is working correctly. Along with selling both new and remanufactured products, MRO Electric and Supply offers both repair and exchange services.

modicon hmi

Modicon was the first manufacturer to release programmable logic controllers onto the market, and since have been one of the top brands for PLC’s. MRO Electric and Supply have all the parts necessary to run the Magelis HMI at it full potential, including panels, cables, controllers, adapters and any software that may be needed. Along with repairs, we handle installations and programming of drives and controllers so that you don’t have to.

We also offer the option to retrofit your old machines with newer interfaces for the most up-to-date applications and processes. By fitting existing HMI’s with new interfaces you are able to add years to the life span of your automation set up. It is a lot easier to update and fix your existing displays and HMIs than taking the time and money to purchase and fit new parts.

All of our repairs come with a 12 month guarantee. Our repair service is based on doing the right job, and getting your part back to you as soon as possible. Every part we refurbish is tested to make sure they work the way they are supposed to. Our factory-trained technicians have many years working with Modicon products.

For a free Modicon Magelis HMI repair quote, please email sales@mroelectric.com or call 800-691-8511.  For more information on our Modicon repair capabilities, you can visit our Modicon Repair page.

PLC Security

plc security

PLC Security

Programmable logic controllers, also known as PLCs, initially came about in the late 1960s. PLCs were designed to replace relay-based machine control systems in the major U.S. vehicle manufacturing space. The relay-based control systems were considered hard to use and were disliked amongst those in the automation and manufacturing in.

In 1968, Dick Morley of Bedford Associates in Massachusetts designed the Modular Digital Controller, later dubbed the Modicon. After the Modicon 084’s initiation into the world, there was no looking back to those relay-based control systems. Be sure to check out our article covering Modicon PLC history to learn more.

PLCs are user-friendly microprocessor-based specialty computers that carry out control functions, many of which are of high levels of complexity. They are engineered to endure harsh and strenuous situations such as in heated, cooled and even moist environments. Used for automation usually in the industrial electromechanical space, PLCs are computers that deal with the controlling of machinery, often on  the following:

  • factory assembly lines
  • power stations
  • distribution systems
  • power generation systems
  • gas turbines

PLCs are programmed using a computer language. Written on a computer, the program is then downloaded to the PLC via a cable. These programs are stored in the PLCs memory. The hard-wired logic is exchanged for the program fed by its user during the transition between relay controls to PLC. The manufacturing and process control industries have gotten to take advantage of PLC applications-oriented software since Modicon PLCs inception.

plc security
PLC Functions and Directions

PLCs use programmable memory in order to store particular functions and directions. Some functions and directions would include:

  • on control
  • off control
  • timing
  • sequencing
  • counting
  • arithmetic
  • data manipulation
PLC Types

Understanding the different types of PLCs will be very helpful when looking into PLC security.

The numerous types of PLCs can be organized into three principal categories:

  • Advanced PLC: Advanced PLCs offer the greatest processing power out of all of the PLC types. They feature a larger memory capacity, higher input/output (I/O) expandability, and greater networking options.
  • Compact Controller: Logic Controllers are increased intermediate level offerings with an increased set of instructions and a greater input/output (I/O) than a run-of-the-mill logic controller
  • Logic Controler: A logic controller is often referred to as a ‘smart relay’. They are generally straightforward to use and considered a good place to begin when becoming acquainted with PLCs. They are cost-effective for low input/output (I/O), slower speed applications.
PLC Security

As security concerns remain in many professional spaces including the factory automation space, becoming up-to-speed with the different types of PLC Security is imperative. By creating and implementing an effective strategy to remain secure, you will likely avoid issues, downtime, and setbacks. Understanding the different types of PLCs will be very helpful when looking into PLC security.

PLC Cybersecurity: How the control network is linked to the internet, as well as other networks. A handful of PLC issues could likely involve the following:

  • Incident response planning and plans;
  • Issues drafting and reviewing policies
  • Issues drafting and reviewing procedures
  • Retention of cybersecurity experts and vendors;
  • A need for preparation of a breach:
    • exercises
    • training
    • breach simulations
  • A need for cybersecurity insurance review and counseling
  • A demand for record management and information infrastructure;
  • Privacy risk management
  • Assessment of cybersecurity risk in mergers and acquisitions;
  • Payment Credit Industry (PCI) Compliance protocols
  • Vendor contract management protocols
  • Supply chain risk management

PLC Physical Security: Although PLC physical security differs from PLC cybersecurity, it is still important and should be prioritized when an individual or a company is undergoing breach simulations, training, and exercises. PLC physical security deals with:

  • correcting default passwords
  • ensuring only certified individuals are in the control system’s environment
  • limiting access to thumb drives and securing access

MRO Electric and Supply maintains a comprehensive stock of Modicon PLC parts, including the Modicon Quantum series. Also, feel free to check out our repair and core exchange programs to learn how to save.

Understanding Issues with Security
In order to create and implement training and procedures for staff, you must understand how issues with security occur.  Not all cybersecurity attacks occur from external hackers or scammers. In fact, experts believe that only an estimated 20% of all cybersecurity attacks are intentional and intended to be malicious. Whether you think it’s possible or not, an offended employee could indeed be your hacker. Almost always caused by software issues, device issues, and malware infections, cybersecurity seems straight-forward initially, until you dig into those fine, often overlooked details.

As many in the automation space may know, PLC cybersecurity wasn’t a thing a decade ago. These days, PLCs are connected to business systems through any run-of-the-mill network and aren’t separated from other networks that other automation equipment may also be on.  As time goes on, it’s becoming more and more common to see TCP/IP networking from a business system standpoint. By connecting via TCP/IP, data exchange, as well as more rational and scalable business decisions, is enabled.

PLC Security Factors:
  • Although it may not actually connect to the internet, a control system is unsafe. Contrary to popular belief, a modem connection could also experience intrusion and a hack.
  • Wireless networks, laptop computers, and trusted vendor connections could be other sources of connections in which people may be likely to overlook.
  • Keep in mind that the majority of IT departments are unaware of factory automation equipment, including CNCs, CPUs, PCBs, robotics parts and, last but not least, PLCs.
  • Piggybacking off of the last point, IT departments’ lack of experience with the aforementioned equipment, along with their lack of experience with industrial standards and scalable processes indicate that they should not be in-charge and responsible for a company’s PLC security. Nobody wants an annoyed employee to make inappropriate changes to a PLC’s communication highway.
  • Hackers do not necessarily need to understand PLC or SCADA to block PC-to-PLC communication. They absolutely do not need to understand a PLC or SCADA system to cause operational or programming issues.
  •  Often times, control systems, including ones that many PLCs integrate with, use Microsoft Windows, which is very popular amongst hackers.
  • Some PLCs crash simply by pinging an IP address, like what happened at the Brown’s Ferry Nuclear Plant, which is located in upstate Alabama. Since the incident in 2006, the plant has undergone numerous security, operational, and management improvements.

In conclusion, when a security breach occurs, regardless of the specifics, understanding that time is of the essence will help smooth over most incidents. Trusting who has access to a control systems environment and thumb drive is crucial. If someone has access to the control system environment and thumb drive, ensure they’re well-qualified and up-to-speed with their team and/or company.

plc

How to maintain a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller)

How to maintain a PLC (Programmable Logic Controller)

As many of us know, PLCs (programmable logic controllers) are staples in the factory automation world. In order to have them running optimally and as efficiently as possible, routine maintenance is imperative. Generally, manufacturers produce PLCs to endure strenuous, unsterilized environments. By adhering to an adequate maintenance schedule, PLCs operating timeframe can be lengthened.

Protect your PLC

Always be on the lookout for corrosive and conductive contaminants that have the potential to become a detriment to a PLCs’ components. By completing visual inspections for black dust and blowing airborne particles from the PLC’s vicinity, you are lowering the likelihood of contamination.

Is power flowing?

A PLC will not operate correctly without adequate power. To avoid any operation bugs, remain vigilant of any surges or shorts.

Calibrate Analog Components

Always refer to the preventative maintenance schedule for any analog input device. Analog inputs need to be cleaned regularly and calibrated as accurately as possible.

Take EMI into consideration

EMI (electromagnetic interference) is known to cause horrible issues for PLCs without clearly indicating what the specific issue is or how to go about fixing it. To remain ahead of the game, many perform an audit of the local wiring to pinpoint potential EMI sources before they interfere with the operation of your PLC. Lower-level components and high-current wires often interfere with each other, which wiring designs must take into consideration.

Additional PLC Maintenance Tips

By creating a PLC maintenance checklist and adhering to it strictly, operating errors can likely be avoided. The space between the PLC and the machine it’s controlling should be minimal.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished Modicon PLC parts available here. We also offer repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Schneider Electric / Modicon PLC and HMI Batteries

Schneider Electric / Modicon PLC and HMI Batteries

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished Schneider Electric and Modicon Quantum parts available now, and also offers repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

Schneider Electric / Modicon PLC and HMI Batteries

Product Line Model Type Part Number Manufacturer
Quantum
140CPUxxxxx
Lithium 3V
990XCP98000
Duracell (DL2/3A)
(soldered connector)
Quantum 140XCP90000 Lithium 990XCP99000
Quantum
141MMS42501
Lithium 3V
990XCP98000 or Duracell (DL2/3A)
43502625 (soldered connector)
Quantum
141MMS53502
Lithium 3V
990XCP98000 or Duracell (DL2/3A)
43502625 (soldered connector)
Compact PC-O984-xxx Lithium 3.6V (long) “O” 60-0576-000 Eternacell (T04/41)
Compact
PC-A984-1xx
Lithium 3.6V (short) “A”
60-0576-100
Saft (LS3)
PC-E984-2xx Maxell (ER3STC)
Momentum
172xNN2xx2
Lithium 3.6V
170XTS15000
Tadiran (TL-5955)
PNN PV:03
JNN PV:01
Momentum 172xNN2xxx2 Alkaline “AAA” Commercially Available
Modicon Micro
110CPUx1x0x
Lithium 110XCP98000 Duracel (DL2/3A)
Capacitor 110XCP99000 (soldered connector)
Modicon 984 AM-C986-003
(2 cell pack)
MA-9255-000
Modicon 984 AM-C986-004
Modicon 984 AM-M907-1xx
Modicon 984 AM-M909-0xx
Modicon 984 AM-C921-xxx 60-0490-000
Modicon 984 PC-L984-x8x
Lithium 3.6V “AA”
60-0515-000
Eternacell (T06141)
Modicon 984 PC-O984-x8x Maxell (ERGC#5)
Modicon 984 PC-E984-x8x Saft (LS6)
Modicon 984 PC-O984-455 Tadaran (TL-5104)
Modicon 984 PC-O984-351
Modicon 984 AM-C986-004
Modicon 984 AM-C996-80x
Modicon 984 PC-M984-23x
Modicon 984 AS-B984-1xx
Modicon 984 AM-S929-00x
Lithium
MA-8234-000
Modicon 984 AS-B885-00x
Modicon 984 AM-O984-ATX 60-0490-000
Modicon 984 Rechargeable (Qty. 2) 60-0610-000
Modicon 984 100-865 (Qty. 3) 60-0595-000
Modicon 984 AM-O984-MCX 60-0582-000
Modicon 884
Modicon 884
AS-884A-xxx
MA-8234-000
AS-J890-x0x
Modicon 584 AS-506P-xxx Lithium (3 card) MA-0147-001
Modicon 584 AS-509P-xxx Lithium (4 card) MA-0147-002
Modicon 584 AS-M507-00x 60-0481-000
Modicon 584
3 Card Battery Pack
Lithium AS-5284-001
Alkaline AS-5284-002
Modicon 584
4 Card Battery Pack
Lithium AS-5378-002
Alkaline AS-5378-001
Modicon 484
Lithium MA-0147-001
Alkaline 60-0286-000
Modbus Multiplexer
Modbus Multiplexer NW-0278-000 60-0549-000
0085/0185 (Sharp)
0085/0185 (Sharp)
(with connector) PA-0254-000 Sharp
(without connector) PA-0493-000 (UBATN-5001-SCZZ)
Symax
Symax
Model 400
Lithium 3.6V “AA”
60-0515-000 Eternacell (T06141)
Model 450 29576-03688 Maxell (ERGC#5)
Model 600 (SqD Part #) Saft (LS6)
Model 650 Tadaran (TL-5104)
PS25
PS35
8052 MCM713
Symax
PS20/21
Alkaline “D”
Commercially Available
PS30/31
PS50/51
PS60/61
Symax
8005 Model 50
Ram Memory Pack
8005 MP1
8005 MP4
Symax
PS20
Battery Holder
29904-08200
(SqD Part#)
Symax
SCP1xx 8020 SMM115
8040 PCM-110 (SqD Part #)
Symax
M100
29904-08960
(SqD Part #)
Symax
8009 Compact
Lithium 3V (Type BA1)
Sanyo (CR12600SE)
TDI Battery Co. (?)
Otte Controls
(DUNT-521NCZZ)
Symax
Symax 20
8884 SBP20
(SqD Part #)
PanelMate
PanelMate
all models
60-0627-000
Maxell
60-0628-000
PanelMate PM0632400 (Qty. 3) 60-0595-000
PanelMate PA-0285-000
PanelMate MA-024M-000
Telemecanique
TSX Premium TSXP57xxx Lithium 3.6V “1/2 AA” TSXPLP01 Saft (LS3)
TSX Micro TSXP37xxx Single TSXPLP101 Maxell (ER3STC)
TSX Micro Ten Pack
TSX Micro
TSXMRPxxxxx
Lithium 3V “Button” TSXBATM01
Panasonic (BR2325)
Single TSXBATM101
10 Pack
CCX17
TCCX17xxx
Lithium 3.6V “1/2 AA” TSXPLP01 Saft (LS3)
Single TSXPLP101 Maxell (ER3STC)
Ten Pack
FTX117
TFTXRSMxxxxx
Lithium 3V “Button” TSXBATM01
Panasonic (BR2325)
Single TSXBATM101
10 Pack
TSX 17
Lithium 3.6V “1/2 AA”
TSX17ACC1
Saft (LS3)
Maxell (ER3STC)
(Soldered Connectors)
XBTKN
Lithium 3.6V “1/2 AA”
TSX17ACC1
Saft (LS3)
XBTKM Maxell (ER3STC)
(Soldered Connectors)
Series 7
TSX 27xx
2.6 V
AZ1 AQ 0006
2.4 Volt with minimum of 110 mAH
TSX P471x/P472x Shrink-wrapped cells
TSX RAM xx 8 Soldered on board
TSX AXM 162
TSX AXM 171xx/182
TSX SCM 2xxx
UC TSX 27
Series 7
TSX P473xx/P474xx 3.6V
AZ1 AQ 0002
3.6 Volt with minum of 110 mAH
TSX P67xxx Shrink-wrapped cells
TSX 76 x Soldered on board
TSX P871/P872/P874xx
TSX P76 x
TSX P107xxx
TPMX P474xx
TPMX P674xx
TPMX874xx
TPMX P1074xx
TSX T407 x
TSX RAM xxx 16
TSX MEM 4x
TSX P87 30/310 3.6V (Qty. 3)

Enhance System Performance with Modicon Quantum I/O Modules

Substation I/O modules for direct 125 Vdc control
Quantum I/O modules are available for direct connection to critical 125 Vdc battery powered equipment such as circuit breakers, protective relays, transformers and capacitor banks.

  • Built-in high transient noise immunity ensures reliable operation in harsh 125 V DC environments.
  • The 125 Vdc 30A high current output module eliminates expensive high current interposing relays used in breaker tripping and closure.
  • The solid-state 125 Vdc low current output module ensures long life and trouble-free operation in higher frequency 125 Vdc switching environments without the use of expensive external snubbing circuitry.
  • Over-current/ short circuit diagnostics and protection on all solid state 125 Vdc outputs reduce downtime by ensuring quick identifi- cation of circuit prob- lems and fast repair.

Latch/Interrupt module for time critical applications
The Quantum Latch/ Interrupt module is a multi-purpose high speed input, latch,
and interrupt module combined, which is configurable through programming software. Interrupt handling instructions are part of the 984 Ladder Logic instruction set. Quantum throughput performance for 2 interrupts is typically 1ms.
High speed counters don’t miss a pulse
Quantum high speed counter modules, such as the 140EHC10500, have the ability to count pulses at speeds much faster than the Quantum controller can directly do by itself. These modules automatically report the current count to the Quantum controller every scan.

Simple ASCII exchanges
The Quantum ASCII module is a general purpose ASCII interface that provides the ability to communicate and ex- change data with devices including printers, bar code readers and scanners, weigh scales, and meters. This module is designed for relatively simple point to point ASCII communications, with ASCII messages stored inside the module triggered by logic within the Quantum controller.

140CPU43412A Error Codes and Hot Standby

Our previous blog post on the 140CPU43412A describes the 140CPU43412A Configuration and Setup. 

140CPU43412A Hot Standby

You cannot create a Quantum Hot Standby configuration running one 140CPU53414A PLC with Unity firmware and one with NxT firmware. When using an NxT configuration in hot standby, both PLCs must have NxT firmware. When using a Unity Quantum hot standby configuration, only specific hot standby controllers can be used. The 140CPU43412A and 140CPU53414A PLCs are not supported in Unity Hot Standby configurations.

140CPU43412A Error Codes

The following are the error codes for the 140CPU43412A:

140CPU43412A Error Codes
140CPU43412A Error Codes
140CPU43412A Error Codes
140CPU43412A Error Codes
140CPU43412A Error Codes
140CPU43412A Error Codes

For ordering info or for a 140CPU43412A price quote you can call 1-800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

140CPU43412A Firmware Part II

Phase 1 of firmware restoration is described in our previous blog post on the 140CPU43412A firmware.

140CPU43412A Firmware Part II

Restoring a 140CPU43412U (Unity) to 140CPU43412A (Concept):

Phase 2

During the download:

• Do not power OFF the PLC

• Do not power OFF the PC

• Do not disconnect the cable

• Do not shut down OS loader

Any loss of communication during the update procedure can cause severe damage to the CPU or NOE module. Failure to follow these instructions can result in injury or equipment damage.

Reset the PLC

Once the download of the intermediate binary file has completed, the PLC has to be initialized. This task can be performed by one of the two following actions:  Reset the PLC by pushing on the Restart button located on the CPU (for more information, refer to the PLC technical documentation).  Power OFF then ON the PLC. Once the PLC has restarted, go to Phase 3: download the final Concept OS.

Phase 3

Presentation

The final binary file “q5rv135E.bin ” (140CPU34312 in our example) has to be downloaded. For that, follow the same procedure as the one described in the Phase 1.

Checking Version (optional)

If needed, you can check the new CPU version. For that  Open the OS loader tool.  Select the communication protocol.  Click on “Connect.” Then Click on “Properties.”

For ordering info or for a 140CPU43412A price quote you can call 1-800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

140CPU43412A
140CPU43412A FIrmware

140CPU43412A Firmware Part I

Click now to view our blog on the 140CPU43412A Configuration and Setup. 

140CPU43412A Firmware

The q5rv144e.bin file supports both Concept (IEC & 984) and ProWORX PLCs.

In order to restore a 140CPU43412U (Unity) to a 140CPU43412A (Concept), three main phases are required.

Phase 1 – Restore the PLC to Concept with an intermediate OS. 

Phase 2 – Power OFF then ON the PLC. 

Phase 3 – Restore the Operating System with the appropriate file.

These phases are mandatory and cannot be by-passed.

Phase 1: 

Launching the OS Loader

The OS loader (provided with Unity) allows the user to download the Operating System to the PLC. To open it click on Start/Program/SchneiderElectric/Unity-PRO/OS loader.

Select the Communication Protocol

From the main screen of the OS loader, click on the “Next” button. To download the Operating System into the PLC, select the right communication protocol (in accordance with established physical link) and click on the “Next” button.

Select the Target Device

On the Device Type field, select Processor and the other needed parameters (Modbus address….). Then connect to the selected PLC (Node).

Select the Download Function 

From the screen described above press the “Next” button. A new screen is proposed: select “Download OS to device”.

Select the File to be Downloaded

Click on the “Browse…” button in order to select the file to download into the PLC. In this example we will restore the OS from 140CPU43412U to 140CPU43412A firmware. For that select the following folders: Quantum\Processor_modules\Unity_to_Concept. To restore the OS from Unity to Concept, two binary files can be selected:  Unity_to_Concept_43412A.bin (allows to “format” the processor to Concept)  q5rv135E.bin is the OS that will finally be downloaded in the processor. In our example we have to “format” the processor (remember, we still are in the Phase 1) then select and Validate “Unity_to_Concept_43412A.bin”. Once done click on the “Next” button.

Download the Intermediate OS

Once the previous screen is validated a warning is displayed: Click the “Okay” button. Two screens that give information regarding the file, the processor and the download are now displayed. Note: If the system detects a discrepancy on the hardware or on the OS version, the download will not be possible. This is indicated by a red cross and the “Next” button becomes unavailable. Solve this issue and continue. When the hardware – OS are compatible, click on the “Download” button to launch the download of the intermediate OS file.

Click Now for 140CPU43412A Firmware  Restoration Phases 2 & 3

For ordering info or for a 140CPU43412A price quote you can call 1-800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

140CPU43412A
140CPU43412A Firmware

140CPU43412A Configuration and Setup

You can check out our previous blog post on the 140CPU43412A manual and configuration here for additional setup info.

Front Panel Topology
There are two switches (a three-position slide switch and a three-position key switch) located on the front of the 140CPU43412A configuration. The module has a single slide switch that is used to select the comm parameter settings for the Modbus (RS-232) ports.
Rear Panel Topology

The address switch, which is comprised of two rotary switches, is located on the rear panel of the Quantum CPUs. The address switch is used for setting Modbus Plus node and Modbus port addresses. SW1 (the top switch) sets the upper digit (tens) of the address, SW2 (the bottom switch) sets the lower digit (ones) of the address. The illustration below shows the correct setting for an example address of 11.

Option Module Interface Support

The 140CPU43412A firmware supports up to six network modules (i.e., Modbus Plus, Ethernet, and Multi-Axis Motion option modules) using the option module interface technique. However, only two Modbus Plus modules can have full functionality, including Quantum DIO support.

For ordering info or for the 140CPU43412A price you can call 1-800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

140CPU43412A
140CPU43412A