Tag Archives: control techniques

Benefits of Upgrading Your HMI to LCD Technology

Human Machine Interfaces, or HMI’s, are used extensively throughout the world to control and monitor automated machinery.  These devices provide touchpad and visual interaction to control manufacturing processes and perform daily tasks.  One of the most recognized HMI devices is the Automated Teller Machine (ATM).  These ATM devices intuitively interface with users through a keypad and monitor to readily transact bank deposits and dispense cash withdrawals.  They provide reliable 24-hour access to our daily banking needs.

siemens

Various HMI devices are common throughout industry.  Many older HMI devices contain the original Cathode Ray Tube (CRT) monitor technology.  This older technology burdens the users and owner with several disadvantages:

  1. High Energy Consumption – The CRT technology is not considered energy efficient.  It requires more power to operate than the newer LCD technology.  CRT screens consume 3 – 4 times the energy when compared to the LCD screens.
  2. Expensive to maintain – CRT repairs are becoming more specialized and expensive as the workforce transitions to the newer technologies.
  3. Obsolete Components – CRT technology is outdated and beyond its life cycle.  Components required to support repair are becoming obsolete and expensive if available.
  4. Avoid costly new operator interface packages – MRO upgrades to LCD technology maintain the interface packages with your existing equipment (frames, communication connections, power sources, etc.).  Updated HMI’s from MRO are plug-n-play.
  5. Better Reliability – Heat generated by the CRT technology often shortens the life of the electrical circuit components.  CRT monitors tend to have a life of 18,000 to 20,000 hours.  LCD monitors provide more than 100,000 hours life.
  6. Clarity of Picture, Crisp Image – LCD’s make the screen burn often associated with CRT’s a thing of the past.  LCD image display is much clearer for the operator and will not fade.

MRO provides an HMI service to update your old CRT displays to LCD technology and new keypads.  This approach is a low-cost upgrade to superior technology with no risks. Visit our repair page, call us, or email us for an instant quote on fixing, swapping, or purchasing your new HMI device.

Our top HMI manufacturers include:

Control Techniques Commander CDE Trips: Troubleshooting

CDE TRIPS ( MEDIUM / LARGE AND HPCDE )

Control Techniques Commander CDE Trips: Troubleshooting

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished Control Techniques parts available now, and also offers repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

 

 

Control Techniques Commander CDE Trips: Troubleshooting

When a failure occurs with the CDE drive the display will flash a series of segment characters for the trip.

Example: tr iP OU

Commander CDE series stores the past ten failure codes in parameters #10.14 – 10.23 in trip number form. A numeric value trip code is a basic form of the symptom for the technician to work with. These past trips can be accessed via the keypad by entering the value of 149 in the keypad at parameter 00.

Scroll to menu 10, for parameter #10.14 to see a trip number.

Example: 6

Symptom explanations provide an avenue on how to analyze the drive for particular problems.

To make the troubleshooting process easier a chart was created to link the type of trip with the symptom.

 

TRIP Display | TRIP Number | Symptom

cL 114-20m Loop of current loop 1
Et2External trip contact has opened
I . t3Overload lxt- Sustained Overcurrent
Oh4Heatsink over temperature- Fan Failure ???
OI AC5Instantaneous AC over current trip
OU6DC bus over voltage-Braking Resistor Problem
Ph7AC Supply phase loss
PS8Internal power supply fault
th9Motor thermistor trip-Hot Motor
OI dC10Instantaneous DC over current trip
EPS11External power supply fault +24vdc short?
th512Motor thermistor short circuit
UU13DC bus under voltage
SCL14Serial comms. Loss-Keypad loose/failure
POdL15Loss of Control keypad
cL2164-20mA Loop Loss of current loop 2
cL3174-20mA Loop Loss of current loop 3
EEF18EEPROM
Prc219Processor 2 fault
OA20Ambient over temperature
rS21Stator resistance measurement failure
OUSP22Overspeed Trip
hFPP26-39Hardware Fault
PhPC100AC Supply phase loss from a drive module
OtPC101Over temperature trip in a Drive module
OtPn102-109Over temperature trip in Drive Module #n
PSPn110-117Over voltage trip in Drive Module #n
I OPn118-125Instantaneous Over current in Drive #n
OuPn126-133Over voltage trip in Drive Module #n
dcPn134-141Instantaneous DC current trip in Drive #n
FtYP142Spurious Unidentified trip
ConF143Module Address switches incorrect
8.8.8.8.-I x t trip Warning flashing dots

 

 

 

 

Emerson Industrial Automation: Unidrive SP Troubleshooting

Emerson Industrial Automation: Unidrive SP Troubleshooting

DIGITAL INPUTS

The Unidrive SP can be enabled to run in several ways. The drive can use digital inputs, keypad, or a field buss networks to give the OK to run. The drive will display inh, rdy, or run depending on the given commands. The drive can be programmed to use positive or negative logic. The logic type is set up at #8.29 in the Control Techniques Unidrive SP. The Unidrive SP defaults to positive logic. When the drive is in positive logic you will need to inject +24VDC to activate the digital inputs. The +24VDC can be supplied by the drive or externally.

The Unidrive SP can be enabled to run in numerous ways.

When the drive is in the terminal mode the following sequence occurs under default conditions:

Unidrive SP:

Inh = Drive disabled = Connect pins 22-31 drive should go to rdy
Rdy = Drive enabled = Connect pins 22-26 drive should go to run
Run = Drive is enabled and ready to run when a speed reference is applied

Parameter #0.05 sets up the Reference Select. This will tell the drive where to search for run commands and speed references. You will only need to close the enable signal if it is set to pad. Then, the keypad can be used to control the drive and to set the speed reference. The speed reference will come in on an analog input if you choose a terminal code. The digital inputs will select the enable, run, and preset selections. The drive should operate as seen above if the digital inputs are activated correctly.

DRIVE SEQUENCER

When the drive is not running, there are several additional parameters in menu 6 that can assess the issue. The digital inputs may be configured wrong or inactive if the parameters are not going to a 1 with the corresponding commands. Check the following parameters:

#6.15 = 1 = Drive enabled

#6.43 = 1 = Control word disabled, Set to 1 for Field Buss Control

#6.29 = 1 = Hardware Enable (Pin 31 is activated)

#6.30 = 1 = Run Forward #6.31 = 1 = Jog

#6.32 = 1 = Run Reverse

#6.33 = 1 = Forward/Reverse

#6.34 = 1 = Run

#6.37 = 1 = Jog Reverse

#6.39 = 1 = Not Stop

 

Unidrive SP

The voltage on the corresponding digital inputs should be measured if the parameters in menu 6 aren’t changing state accordingly. The DC voltage should change between 0VDC and 24VDC when a command is given. Check the digital input configuration in menu 8 if menu 6 isn’t changing and the voltage is.

CONTROL WORD

To control the start/stop functions, the drive does not have to use the digital inputs. When #6.43 = 1 the control word is enabled. The drive will now accept a decimal value from 0 to 32767 at #6.42. This decimal value can be converted to a binary value.To see the function that will be carried out, you can reference the binary value to the chart below.

Unidrive SP

Speed Reference

The drive still may not run if the digital inputs and the drive sequencer are each working properly. There could be an issue with the speed reference to the drive if the display shows Run but the motor isn’t turning. The speed reference is able to be applied in several methods. An analog input can be used (current or voltage), preset speeds, and a field buss reference. The example is a 0-10VDC signal on analog input #1.

The final speed of the demand is parameter #3.01. The speed reference should be displayed here if the digital inputs and the drive sequencer are failing to operate properly. Check menu 1 and 2 to determine where it is stopping if the reference is not getting to this point.

If the drive is running in torque mode, the torque reference will come on parameter #4.08 under default conditions. #4.08 is able to be linked to an analog input or be written to via a filed buss network.

 

Unidrive SP

 

#7.01 should be inspected to determine if it changes with the change in reference at terminal 5 once the signal has been confirmed. #7.01 goes from +/- 0% – 100%. Check the destination of the speed reference at #7.10 if everything looks good. Follow it to the destination and confirm the speed reference value is arriving there and then through #3.01.

 

Unidrive SP

 

Contact the America’s Service Center if the drive will still not run after the Speed Reference, Digital Inputs and Drive Sequencer have all been confirmed.

MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished Control Techniques Unidrives available now, and also offers repair pricing. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.

 

 

Emerson Industrial Automation: Unidrive Classic HF Trip Codes

Emerson Industrial Automation: Unidrive Classic HF Trip Codes
This document is pertinent to all Unidrive Classic models
MRO Electric and Supply has new and refurbished Control Techniques Unidrives  available now, along with our other Control Techniques products. Contact us about pricing for repairs. For more information, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.
Emerson Industrial Automation: Unidrive Classic HF Trip Codes

HF81 Software Error (odd address word)

Unidrive Fault Code DiagnosticsHF81 HF82 HF83 HF84 HF85 HF86 HF87 HF88 HF89 HF90 HF91 HF92 HF93 HF94 HF95 HF96 HF97 HF98 HF99

HF82 Large Option Module Missing

HF83 Power Board Code Failure

HF84 Current Offset Trim Failure

HF85 A to D failure (ES-CC step)

HF86 Interrupt Watchdog failure

HF87 Internal ROM check error

HF88 Watchdog Failure

HF89 Unused Interrupts (nmi as source)

HF90 Stack Overflow

HF91 Stack Underflow

HF92 Software Error (undefined op code)

HF93 Software Error (protection fault)

HF94 Software Error (odd address word)

HF95 Software Error (odd address instruction)

HF96 Software Error (illegal ext bus)

HF97 Level 1 Noise

HF98 Interrupt Crash

HF99 Level 1 Crash

 

HF Faults are not recorded in the Drive Historical Fault Log

All of the above HF trips in BLUE are typically a result of some sort of hardware failure on the UD90A control PCB. This control board is common to all Unidrive Classics.

For the HF codes in RED refer to the following page

HF82 Large option module missing

If one of the UD7x large option modules is removed, the trip may be expected. There is an issue with either the large option module or the UD90A control PCB if this trip occurs at any other time than the case above.

HF83 Power Board Code Failure

Because the UD90A control PCB was unable to recognize the power rating of the power PCB it is connected to, this trip occurred.

The trip is likely due to the power PCB in the Drive or a problem with the UD90A control PCB on Unidrive Sizes 1 to 4 (which includes UNI1401, UNI1402, UNI1403, UNI1404, UNI1405, UNI2401, UNI2402, UNI2403, UNI3401, UNI3402, UNI3403, UNI3404, UINI3405, UNI4401, UNI4402, UNI4403, and UNI4404).

UD99 PCB or the UD90A PCB cause the trip on a Unidrive Size 5. The interconnects between the PCBs should also be checked, as they could also cause a trip.

HF84 Current Offset Trim Failure

Due to an issue with the current feedback on the drive, this trip occurs. The trip is likely due to the power PCB in the Drive on Unidrive Sizes 1 to 4. An issue with the UD90A control PCB may also cause this trip.

The UD99 PCB or the UD90A PCB cause the trip on a Unidrive Size 5, along with the interconnects between the PCBs.

HF88 Watchdog Failure

This trip can result from a faulty UD7x Co-Processor. With power off, remove Co-Processor and re-apply power.

HF82 Large option module missing

If one of the UD7x larger option modules is removed while the Drive is powered up, this trip is likely to occur. There is an issue with either the UD90A control PCB or the large option module if this trip were to occur at any other time.

HF83 Power Board Code Failure

The UD90A control PCB was unable to recognize the power rating of the power PCB it is connected to, which is what caused the trip.

The trip is likely due to the power PCB in the Drive on Unidrive Sizes 1 to 4, however, an issue with the UD90A control PCB is also able to cause this trip.

The trip is caused by the UD90A PCB, the UD99 PCB, or the interconnects between the PCBs on a Unidrive Size 5.

 

HF84 Current Offset Trim Failure

If there is an issue with the current feedback on the Drive, this trip will occur. The trip is likely due to the power PCB in the Drive, but an issue with the UD90A control PCB could also result in a trip on Unidrive Sizes 1 to 4.

On a Unidrive Size 5, the trip is cause by either UD99 PCB or the UD90A PCB. The interconnects between the PCBs could also cause this trip and should be checked.

A trip could be caused by either UD99 PCB, UD90A PCB, or the interconnects between the PCBs on a Unidrive Size 5.

HF88 Watchdog Failure

A faulty UD7x Co-Processor and large option module, ( includes UD70, UD71, UD73, UD74, UD75, and UD76) can cause this trip. Remove Co-Processor and re-apply power with power off.

Unidrive Fault Code DiagnosticsHF81 HF82 HF83 HF84 HF85 HF86 HF87 HF88 HF89 HF90 HF91 HF92 HF93 HF94 HF95 HF96 HF97 HF98 HF99

UD55 Small Option Module for Control Techniques Unidrives

The UD55 Cloning Small Option Module can store up to eight parameters-sets which contain all the read–write parameters for a Drive, and include those in Menus 16 & 20, when applicable. These parameter sets can be individually recalled for loading onto the same or another drive.

The cloning of drives can only be performed when the operating mode (Open-loop, Closed-loop Vector, Servo or Regen) of the destination drive is the same as that of the source drive. The UD55 must be fitted in the small option module bay of the Unidrive. All connections to the drive are made by a multi-way connector. Connections from external equipment are made to a plug-in 16-way screw-terminal block on the option module. Some parameters have a profound effect on the operation of the Unidrive. They must not be altered without careful consideration of the impact on the controlled system. Measures must be taken to prevent unwanted changes due to error or tampering.

UD55 Installation

1. Disconnect the AC supply from the Drive.
2. Check that the exterior of the UD55 is not damaged, and that the multi-way connector is free from dirt and debris. Do not fit a damaged or dirty UD55 in a Unidrive.
3. Remove the terminal cover from the Drive.
4. If a small option module is already fitted in the Unidrive, grip the recesses at the ends of the module and pull the module out of the Drive. Keep the module for re-fitting.
5. Position the multi-way connector on the rear of the UD55 over the connector in the Drive (see figure below), and press on the thumb pad to push the UD55 into place.

UD55 Installation
UD55 Installation

Saving Parameters

If the Drive trips and a trip code is displayed while this procedure is being followed, ensure that all the required parameters have been set up in the source Drive and that new parameter values have been saved.
If a small option module was fitted in the Drive, its associated Menu 16 parameters will be copied to the UD55 in addition to the parameters in the other menus.
1. Insert the UD55 in the source Drive (refer to Chapter 3, Inserting theUD55 in a Drive).
2. Ensure terminal 30 of the Drive Signal connector is open-circuit so that the Drive does not become enabled when powered-up.
3. On the UD55 connector, connect terminal 40 directly to terminal 41 to enable the save function (see Figure 2).
4. Re-fit the terminal cover to the Drive.
5. Connect the AC supply to the Drive.
6. Decide which parameter-set number is to be used in the UD55. If a parameter-set already contains parameter values, these will be over-written without warning. It is recommended that a record is made of at least the following for each parameter-set number:
• A means of identifying the configuration of the source Drive
• The model size of the source Drive
• The type(s) of option module(s) fitted
• Motor ratings
7. Set parameter .00 (in any menu) at 300X, where X is the required parameter-set number (1 to 8).
8. Press . The parameter values are now copied (saved) to the UD55.
Saving takes approximately 5 seconds. When it has finished, parameter .00 returns to zero.
9. It is recommended that parameter 11.38 is set at the number of the parameter-set (value of X in step 7) and the value of parameter 11.40 UD55 full parameter check sum noted, as a means of identifying the parameter-set at a later date.
10. Disconnect the AC supply from the Drive.
11. Remove the terminal cover.
12. Disconnect the link between terminals 40 and 41 on the UD55 connector.
13. Remove the UD55 from the Drive.
14. If a small option module was previously fitted in the Drive, re-fit the module.
15. Replace the terminal cover.
16. The Drive can now be used.

MRO Electric provides sales and support for Control Techniques Unidrives and their Option Modules. To request a quote or for more information, visit our UD55 Product Page or call 800-691-8511.

UD73 Configuration and Setup

You can check out our previous blog post on the UD73 here for additional setup and configuration info.

For UD73 configuration, most common parameters are arranged in one concise menu. Hundreds of user-configurable functions separated into 20 logical menus provide quick setup for advanced application. For positioning, ratio control, camming and multi-axis systems, plug-in option modules easily extend the Unidrive’s capabilities. High horsepower Unidrives cover the range from 200 to 1600 HP. The 300 amp power module and control pod (the “brain”) are available as components. They are also available as a packaged drive solution that includes fusing and a disconnect. (See our Packaged Drive Section, pages 120-123 and 128-133.) With the UD73’s extensive selection of communication, application, feedback and I/O modules, you can easily upgrade the performance of your drive. Yet, it is simple to configure by using the drive keypad, a remote keypad (CTKP), or UniSoft, the UD73 Windows based drive set-up tool. You can tailor each Unidrive to be the drive you want when you want it.
  • Digital AC Drive
  • 1 to 30 HP, 3 Phase, 208-230 VAC
  • 1 to 1600 HP, 3 Phase, 380-460 VAC
  • Five operating modes
    • V/Hz
    • Open loop vector
    • Closed loop vector
    • Brushless AC servo
    • Regenerative
  • UniSoft Windows based configuration tool
  • Configurable analog and digital I/O
  • Complete Motor Solutions

 

The UD73 configuration is suited for use with AC brushless servo motors. Servo control is ideal for applications requiring load transfer to and from any position, at any speed. The UD73 is designed for both stand-alone and multi-axis system applications.
In regen mode, two standard UD73’s operate together to provide full four-quadrant control of an AC motor. The system consists of two basic sub-systems, one being a Unidrive operating in any of its standard operating modes (open loop, vector or servo), and the other is a Unidrive operating in its regenerative mode. The link between the two sub-systems is simply the DC bus connections. In this mode, the UD73 is capable
of either supplying power to the DC bus of the Unidrive controlling the motor or removing power from the DC bus of the Unidrive controlling the motor and returning it back to the power line.
If you would like to order a module or get more info you can email sales@mroelectric.com or call 1-800-691-8511.

UNI1405 Configuration and Setup

You can check out our previous blog post on the UNI1405 parameters and manual here with additional setup info. Check out our entire collection of Unidrives on our website.

With the UNI1405 configuration, the volts / frequency ratio must be kept constant to ensure rated torque is available from the motor over the frequency range. At low frequencies (from 0 Hz to ½ x Pr 5.06) the voltage is increased from this characteristic by a level governed by either the voltage boost parameter or the motor parameters (found during the stator resistance test) depending on whether the drive is in fixed boost or open loop vector mode as shown aside.

UNI1405 Motor Rated Power Factor

The power factor is found by the UNI1405 4kw during the autotune procedure. It is used in the open loop vector algorithm and to set the current limit levels for the torque producing (active) current.

Emerson UNI1405 4kw Motor Rated Speed

The motor rated speed parameter should be set to the synchronous speed of the motor minus the slip speed. This is often displayed on the motor nameplate. I.e. For a typical 18.5 kW, 50 Hz, 4 pole motor the motor rated speed is 1465 rpm. The synchronous speed for a 4 pole motor is 1500 rpm therefore the slip speed is 35 rpm Synchronous speeds for different numbers of poles are as follows:
2 pole = 3,000 rpm
4 pole = 1,500 rpm
6 pole = 1,000 rpm
8 pole = 750 rpm
The accuracy of this parameter is very important as it directly affects the torque produced at the shaft. Often the value given on the motor nameplate is not
100% accurate which can lead to a loss of torque.
For ordering info or a UNI1405 price you can call 1-800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.
UNI1405 Configuration
UNI1405 Configuration

UD73 Module: Beyond the Manual

The Control Techniques UD73 large option module is a high speed microprocessor that provide a low cost facility for a system designer to write app specific programs without needing a PLC or other stand-alone controllers. The module is programmed via the RS232 port using the Control Techniques system programming toolkit.

The UD73 module uses a dual port RAM to interface to the drive’s main processor which provides intimate high-speed bi-directional access. It can ready and modify any of the parameters within the drive. This enables customized real-time calculations under a multi-tasking run-time environment.

The optically isolated RS485 port serves as a communication for for the CTIU operator interface units. It is fully configurable, supporting many communication modes. In addition, the module has the Profibus-DP port for additional communication options.

For additional info you can visit the UD73 product page on our website here. We will continue to post info about the Control Technique option modules in the future. If you would like to order a module or get more info you can email sales@mroelectric.com or call 1-800-691-8511.

The table below shows a quick reference for all of the different option modules that can be used with the Unidrive Classic series. We have all of the different modules available and in stock.

UD73 Table
UD73 Table

 

Emerson Commander SK Trip Codes

Commander SK Trip Codes

 

HF01 to HF03
Not used
HF04
Low DC bus at power up- may indicate an AC Input or pre-charge problem
HF05
No internal handshake signal from second processor (DSP) at start up
HF06
Unexpected interrupt
HF07
Watchdog failure
HF08
Interrupt crash (code overrun)
HF09 to HF10
Not used
HF11
Access to the EEPROM failed- tried to read stored parameter data but failed
HF12 to HF19
Not used
HF20
Power stage – code error Tried to read power board and read back erroneous
HF21
Power stage – unrecognized frame size
HF22
Overcurrent detection at power up- possible output short or bridge failure
HF23
DSP software overrun
HF24
Not Used
HF25
DSP Communications failure- communication from main to 2nd processor
HF26
Soft start relay failed to close; or soft start monitor failed; or braking
IGBT short circuit at power up
HF27
Power stage thermistor fault
HF28
Power circuit thermistor 2 or 3 fault Internal fan fault on size 3 only
HF29
Fan failure (current too high – only on drives with a fan) see note below
HF30
Not used
HF31
Internal Cap Bank Fan failure- check for fan rotation/blockage Size 4 and up
HF32
Power circuit temperature feedback multiplexer failure

Unidrive SP SM-EZ Motion HF Trips

Unidrive SP SM-EZ Motion HF Trips

This guide is meant to help clear SM-EZ Motion HF Trips on a Unidrive SP drive from Emerson Control Techniques. The SM-EZ motion module is used with SP drives and is programmed using Power Tools Pro. It allows users to create specific motion profiles such as indexing, home routines, electronic gearing, and many others.

An HF (hardware fault) can be generated by the drive if there is a problem with the solutions module. The drive will display the trip as SLX.HF. It is sometimes possible to correct this trip without replacing the module. The EZ Motion program in the module may become corrupt which can cause this type of trip. Clearing the program and setting the module back to factory settings may resolve the trip. Before clearing the module a drive reset and power cycle should be performed.

They could correct the trip as well.

unidrive sp
Module Clearing Procedure

1. Ensure the module is installed in any slot

2. Enter 19237 at #18.01

3. Cycle power to the drive

4. The drive will trip SLX.ER on power up. This is a 107 “No Program” trip

5. Press the red reset button to clear the SLX.ER trip

6. Reload your EZ Motion program back into the drive.

The HF trip could be resolved at this point.

 

MRO Electric supplies and repairs a large number of Control Techniques Unidrive SP parts. To request a quote, please call 800-691-8511 or email sales@mroelectric.com.